Courses

Fall 2017

Begins on: 
August 16, 2017

SASIAN - Introduction to the Civilization of Early India

SASIAN 1A
MOFF101
MWF 1-1:59P
4.0
20322
Clare, Jennifer

 

Discussion Sections

Section Day/Time Room Instructor Class #
101 DIS M 2-2:59P VLSB2062Brooks, Lisa 20323
102 DIS - CANCELED

  20324
103 DIS Tu 3-3:59P DWIN283Brooks, Lisa 22042

SASIAN - Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition)

SASIAN R5A
DWIN225
MWF 12-12:59P
4.0
20390
Whittington, Rebecca

SASIAN - Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition)

SASIAN R5A
VLSB2070
MWF 1-1:59P
4.0
20391
Archambault , Hannah

SASIAN - Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition)

Canceled
SASIAN R5A
DWIN211
MWF 2-2:59P
4.0
20392
The Staff

SASIAN - Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition)

SASIAN R5A
DWIN263
TTh 11-12:59P
4.0
45285
Paul, Abhijeet

Diversity of traditions in premodern South Asian literature

This course explores the diversity of traditions in premodern South Asian literature. Students will read selections from epics, myths, and medieval poetry, focusing on the diversity of these traditions and on their expressions in the visual and performing arts. They will practice close reading, ask productive questions, and craft compelling arguments in their essays.

SASIAN - Buddhist Thought in India

Canceled
SASIAN C113
BARR104
Th 9:30-10:59A
4.0
22656
The Staff

Meets the L&S Breadth Requirement in both Arts & Literature and Philosophy and Values.

SASIAN - Tibetan Buddhism

SASIAN C114
DWIN205
TTh 2-3:29P
4.0
22053
Ronis, Jann

Meets the L&S breadth requirements in both Historical Studies and Philosophy & Values.

SASIAN - Religion in Modern India

Canceled
SASIAN 128
BARR587
TTh 11-12:59P
4.0
44536
Paramasivan, Vasudha

Fulfills the L&S breadth requirement in Arts & Literature.

SASIAN - Hindu Mythology

SASIAN 140
DWIN145
MWF 11-11:59A
4.0
21921
Gonzalez-Reimann, Luis

In this course we will study literary and religious aspects of Hindu myths. Through the reading of primary sources in translation, the course covers the main divinities and many mythological themes of early Vedic as well as later Puranic literature. We will follow the development of mythology from the Rg Veda to the epics—The Mahabharata and the Ramayana—and up to the classical mythology of the Sanskrit Puranas.

SASIAN - Islam in South Asia

Canceled
SASIAN 144
DWIN109
TTh 11-12:59P
4.0
44397
Faruqui, Munis

SASIAN - Readings in Indian Buddhist Texts

SASIAN C215
DWIN288
W 3-5:59P
2-4
22886
von Rospatt, Alexander

This seminar is dedicated to reading Vinaya materials in the Sanskrit original. It also serves to introduce to the study of the Vinaya more broadly, and will include the reading of pertinent secondary literature. Our principal source will be the Vinayavastu of the Mūlasarvāstivādins, and in particular the Adhikaraṇavastu, which deals with procedural and legal matters. Time permitting, we may also turn to the śīla chapter of the Bodhisattvabhūmi and read matching passages treating the bodhisattva precepts.

SASIAN - Readings in Tibetan Buddhist Texts

SASIAN C224
DWIN288
M 3-5:59P
2-4
20301
Soerensen,Per K

SEASIAN - Introduction to the Civilization of Southeast Asia

SEASIAN 10A
DWIN88
TTh 12:30-1:59P
4.0
20766
Edwards, Penelope

Fulfills the L&S breadth requirements in either Historical Studies or International Studies.

Discussion Sections

Section Day/Time Room Instructor Class #
101 DIS Th 3-3:59P VLSB2070Warshall, Sophia 20756
102 DIS F 2-2:59P DWIN250Warshall, Sophia 20757

SSEASN - Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition)

SSEASN R5A
EVAN7
MWF 11-11:59A
4.0
20280
Scalice, Joseph

SSEASN - Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition)

SSEASN R5A
EVAN47
MWF 12-12:59P
4.0
21396
Scalice, Joseph

SSEASN - Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition)

Canceled
SSEASN R5A
EVAN7
MWF 1-1:59P
4.0
21397
The Staff

SSEASN - Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition)

SSEASN R5A
DWIN228
TTh 9:30-10:59A
4.0
45283
Collins, Rebekah

SSEASN - Introduction to the Study of Buddhism

SSEASN C52
VLSB2060
MWF 1-1:59P
4.0
22046
Sharf, Robert

Fulfills the L&S breadth requirements in Philosophy and Values.


Discussion Sections

Section Day/Time Room Instructor Class #
101 DIS TBA TBA The Staff 22047
102 DIS TBA TBA The Staff 22048
103 DIS TBA TBA The Staff 22049
104 DIS TBA TBA The Staff 22050
105 DIS TBA TBA The Staff 22051
106 DIS TBA TBA The Staff 22052

SSEASN - SOPHOMORE SEMINAR - Southeast Asian Film

SSEASN 84
DWIN233
F 2-3:59P
1-2
21457
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi

Prerequisites - sophomore standing. In this seminar, we will examine contemporary Southeast Asian society and culture through the lens of contemporary Southeast Asian films from two countries -- Vietnam and the Philippines.  In discussions about the films in class we will seek to understand how these films mirror modern and traditional aspects of the societies in which they were produced.  We will also consider the films as examples of current world cinema and vehicles of storytelling.  In their four page papers for each section of the course, students will address the above broad issues (referencing class discussions when appropriate) in relation to their own experiences and opinions, focusing either on one film or comparing two or three from the same country.

SSEASN - Islam, Gender and the State in Southeast Asia

SSEASN 120
DWIN209
TTh 3:30 - 4:59P
4.0
44557
Tiwon, Sylvia

Islam has been a shaping force in many of the cultures and politics of Southeast Asia since the earliest days of global commerce predating Western colonialism.  The Islamic Revival that has swept through the Islamic world since at least the 1970s, and the rise of the internet have brought important changes to this region, which includes Indonesia--the nation with the world's largest Muslim population--Malaysia, Brunei, the southern Philippines and southern Thailand, with important Muslim communities on the Southeast Asian mainland.  This course offers a survey of the constructions, practices and contestations of gender against the background of trade, colonialism, and the current flows of cultural and financial capital through which bodies and subjectivities are articulated.  Through texts including ethnographic writing, literature, film and political discourse, we will explore the interface of indigenous customary practice ('adat), universalisms, nationalisms, and social justice to look at masculinities, femininities and hybrid sexualities.

Readings:  Atheist, a novel by A. K. Mihardja, Gender and Islam in Southeast Asia, Susanne Schröter;  selections from: Gender and Power in Indonesian Islam: Leaders, Feminists, Sufis and pesantren selves,  Bianca J. Smith and Mark Woodward, eds;  selections from Bewitching Women, Pious Men: Gender and Body Politics in Southeast Asia, Aihwa Ong and Michael Peletz, eds; I Am Muslim, Dina Zaman.  An Ocean of Jilbab, poetry by Emha Ainun Najib; "Delirium" a short story by Shahnon Ahmad.  Muslims and Matriarchs: Cultural Resilience in Indonesia through Jihad and Colonialism (selected chapters) by Jeffrey Hadler.

(This list of readings is tentative).

SSEASN - Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Studies

SSEASN 250
DWIN210
W 3-5:59P
1-4
22192
Faruqui, Munis

Islamic South Asia

Drawing on a broad cross-section of theoretical and methodological perspectives this course will interrogate some of the key historiographical debates that have shaped our understanding of the Muslim experience in S. Asia between 700 and 1700 AD. You will be expected to not only think about the ways in which knowledge gets constituted and its impacts (both within academia and beyond) but also the question of historical method itself.

Readings will include: Sunil Kumar, The Emergence of the Delhi Sultanate (2007); Blain Auer, Symbols of Authority in Medieval Islam: History, Religion and Muslim Legitimacy in the Delhi Sultanate (2012);Cynthia Talbot, The Last Hindu Emperor: Prithviraj Chauhan and the Indian Past, 1200-2000;Samera Shaikh, Forging a Region: Sultans, Traders and Pilgrims in Gujarat, 1200-1500 (2010); Richard Eaton, A Social History of the Deccan (2005); Stephen Dale, Garden of the Eight Paradises (2004); Rajeev Kinra, Writing Self, Writing Empire: Chandar Bhan Brahman and the Cultural World of the Indo-Persian State Secretary (2015); Robert Hallisey, The Rajput Rebellion against Aurangzeb (1977); and Santhi Kaveri-Bauer, Monumental Matters: The Power, Subjectivity, and Space of India’s Mughal Architecture (2011)

SSEASN - Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Studies

SSEASN 250
DWIN210
Tu 3-5:59P
1-4
22040
Edwards, Penelope

Crime Friction: Detecting Modernity in Southeast Asia & Empire

This seminar explores the history of modernity and empire in Southeast Asia through the figures of the bandit, policeman, detective, and writer/reader.  The first section explores histories and cultural myths and literary legacies of bandits, alongside the imperial vocabulary of dacoit/terrorist/bandit.  The second section focuses on police and surveillance techniques in city and empire, including censorship of print and visual media. The third  section focuses on the detective genre. We consider the translation and adaptations of Sherlock Holmes in Siam and Burma, and also why this genre was slow to catch on in Southeast Asia.  Most of our readings are on/about mainland Southeast Asia, but we will also read some comparative work on Hong Kong, Japan & Shanghai.  Our texts will be primarily historical and scholarly, but we will also read & view some primary sources including excerpts from Southeast Asian epic literature, Buddhist lore, and detective film & fiction.   A syllabus and reading list is available on request from pennyedwards [at] berkeley [dot] edu

Meets the Graduate Certificate in Global Urban Humanities elective requirement

BENGALI - Introductory Bengali

BANGLA 1A
DWIN106
MW 12-1:59P
5.0
44266
Basu, Amitabha

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

This is a beginner's course for learning Bengali language - where students learn the fundamentals of the language, like alphabet, basic grammar, familiarity with sentence-structures, reading and understanding simple texts, and speaking the language to express their feelings to carry out simple conversations in Bengali.


BURMESE - Introductory Burmese

BURMESE 1A
DWIN233 & DWIN104
WTh 4-5:59P & F 4-4:59P
5.0
22450
Wong, Kenneth

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

Burmese 1A focuses primarily on Colloquial (or Spoken) Burmese, with some excursions into the Literary Style, usually reserved for written communication.

Lessons include the following:

  • Pose and respond to Yes-No questions.
  • Pose and respond to Who, What, Where, When, Why questions.
  • Read and write words in the Ah, Ee, U (Oo), Ay, Ae, Aw diacritic families.
  • Read and write words in the Un, In, Oh diacritic families.
  • Read and write words in the Ut, It, Et diacritic families.

You'll learn to speak in simulated conversations, where you get to be a shopkeeper in Bogyoke Market, a pilgrim on the way to Shwe Dagon, and a diner in a Mandalay restaurant.

You'll learn to read by studying fragments of poetry, passages from short stories, song lyrics, and political cartoons.

You'll learn to write by attempting your own poems, prose, song titles, and song lyrics.


FILIPINO - Introductory Filipino

FILIPN 1A
DWIN262
MTWThF 11-11:59A
5.0
14797
Aban, Cynthia

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

The Filipino 1A Beginners’ class emphasizes the four basic skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The course uses the functional approach in learning a language.

The students focus on basic conversational skills in Filipino.  At the end of the course, they should be able to use Filipino in introduction, greetings and situations such as shopping, telling the time, counting, going to the market; and asking and giving directions.  They should also be able to use Filipino in: describing people, objects, and places.

The teacher shall use Filipino and English with the aid of pictures and other teaching materials.  However, English may be used in explaining grammar rules and discussing Philippine culture.  Classroom techniques shall include games, songs, pair- work, role- plays and writing exercises.

FILIPINO - Introductory Filipino

FILIPN 1A
DWIN262
MTWThF 12-12:59P
5.0
14798
Aban, Cynthia

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

The Filipino 1A Beginners’ class emphasizes the four basic skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The course uses the functional approach in learning a language.

The students focus on basic conversational skills in Filipino.  At the end of the course, they should be able to use Filipino in introduction, greetings and situations such as shopping, telling the time, counting, going to the market; and asking and giving directions.  They should also be able to use Filipino in: describing people, objects, and places.

The teacher shall use Filipino and English with the aid of pictures and other teaching materials.  However, English may be used in explaining grammar rules and discussing Philippine culture.  Classroom techniques shall include games, songs, pair- work, role- plays and writing exercises.

FILIPINO - Introductory Filipino

FILIPN 1A
DWIN262
MTWThF 1-1:59P
5.0
14799
Aban, Cynthia

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

The Filipino 1A Beginners’ class emphasizes the four basic skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The course uses the functional approach in learning a language.

The students focus on basic conversational skills in Filipino.  At the end of the course, they should be able to use Filipino in introduction, greetings and situations such as shopping, telling the time, counting, going to the market; and asking and giving directions.  They should also be able to use Filipino in: describing people, objects, and places.

The teacher shall use Filipino and English with the aid of pictures and other teaching materials.  However, English may be used in explaining grammar rules and discussing Philippine culture.  Classroom techniques shall include games, songs, pair- work, role- plays and writing exercises.

FILIPINO - Introductory Filipino for Heritage Learners Online

FILIPN W1X
ONLINE
MW 4-5:29P & F 4-5:59P
5.0
22851
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

Five hours of lecture per week online in synchronous time. Prerequisites: None.  Do you know the words nanay (mother), tatay (father), sinigang (sour soup), masarap (delicious), and kawawa (poor you)? Would you like to better communicate with your grandparents who speak Filipino and only have a limited knowledge of English? You may be a heritage learner, or a person who has a proficiency in or a cultural connection to the language he/she is studying. Filipino 1X WBL is an elementary Filipino class designed for heritage learners. It is the first course in the elementary Filipino for Heritage Learners sequence (Filipino 1X and Filipino 1Y). This course builds on the students’ passive vocabulary to harness four basic skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The functional-situational approach in learning a language is used in this class. 

Discussion Section

Section Day/Time Room Instructor Class #
101 WBL TBAOnline Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi22851

FILIPINO - Intermediate Filipino

FILIPN 100A
DWIN189 & DWIN163
TTh 12:30-1:59P & F 12-1:59P
5.0
14767
Llagas, Karen

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

FILIPINO - Intermediate Filipino

FILIPN 100A
DWIN89 & DWIN189
TTh 2-3:29P & F 2-3:59P
5.0
14768
Llagas, Karen

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

FILIPINO - Intermediate Filipino Online

FILIPN W100A
ONLINE
TTh 9:30-10:59A & F 10-11:59P
5.0
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

Five hours of lecture per week online in synchronous time. Prerequisites.  Completion of Filipino or Tagalog 1A or 1B or one year of Tagalog instruction, or placement test. This is an intermediate class. The students shall learn four skills in the use of Filipino:  paglalahad (explaining); paglalarawan (description);  pagsasalaysay (narrating a story); and pangangatwiran (argumentation).  Vocabulary is expanded through dialogues and essays.  Each lesson shall have three components:  reading to increase vocabulary and study grammatical structures; doing a role-play; and writing a dialogue or a paragraph. Other techniques are games, songs, and pair work. At the end of the course, the students should be able to talk about themselves, their families and communities; narrate events and stories, give instructions and explanations,  and express opinions.

FILIPINO - Advanced Filipino Online

FILIPN 101A
LATI121
TTh 11-12:29P
3.0
66877
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi

Two years of Filipino/Tagalog or consent of instructor. 

Why do you use a language? Would you like to read more Filipino academic or literary texts, watch a Filipino soap opera of film without subtitles, or perhaps be able to translate and interpret? In this class, we will learn more about the Filipino language and Philippine society through short articles, essays, and literary texts.  These texts, available only in Tagalog/Filipino,  will also provide us with an overview of Philippine history and society.  Moreover, we will be working with examples of the changing orthography of the Filipino language through texts that range from 19th-century Tagalog, 1950s Pilipino, and 1990s Filipino. Among our learning strategies are listening/watching authentic video/audio texts, and writing essays/creative work.

HINDI - Introductory Hindi

HINURD 1A
DWIN235
MTWThF 10-10:59A
5.0
15281
Sirasao, Pranjali

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

This course emphasizes development of the full range of Hindi language skills: reading, listening, comprehension, the use of grammatical structures, and oral and written communication—through a variety of learning themes. Individual and small group activities, interactive work and multimedia-based activities reinforce language skills and provide the platform for adapting the curriculum to specific student learning goals. Use of graded exercises and readings drawn from Hindi literature, leads to the mastery of grammatical structures, essential vocabulary and achievement of basic reading and writing competence.

HINDI - Introductory Hindi

HINURD 1A
DWIN235
MTWThF 11-11:59A
5.0
15282
Sirasao, Pranjali

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

This course emphasizes development of the full range of Hindi language skills: reading, listening, comprehension, the use of grammatical structures, and oral and written communication—through a variety of learning themes. Individual and small group activities, interactive work and multimedia-based activities reinforce language skills and provide the platform for adapting the curriculum to specific student learning goals. Use of graded exercises and readings drawn from Hindi literature, leads to the mastery of grammatical structures, essential vocabulary and achievement of basic reading and writing competence.

HINDI - Intermediate Hindi

HINURD 100A
DWIN187
MWF 12-12:59P
5.0
15090
Sirasao, Pranjali

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

Prerequisites: 1A-1B or instructor's consent

Intermediate language course will focus on expanding all language skills (reading, writing, speaking), mastering grammar patterns and new vocabulary through authentic readings from classical and contemporary Hindi literature, epics, mythology and current events. This course acquaints students with representative readings from Hindi texts on pivotal cultural issues from a wide variety of sources, to enable them to acquire cultural competence in the language. Systematic training in advanced grammar and syntax, reinforced by exercises in composition, both oral and written will be integral part of the course. Special attention is given towards developing communication skills through audio/video, digital media and current events. Second year sequence requires completion of the first year course or consent of the instructor.

Discussion Sections

Section Day/Time Room Instructor Class #
101 DIS W 1-:59P DWIN250 Sirasao, Pranjali 44502

 

HINDI - Readings in Modern Hindi

HINURD 101A
DWIN210
TTh 11-12:29P
3.0
15146
Jain, Usha

This course is designed for students who have already achieved an intermediate level of proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing Hindi. Its objective is to move students toward a greater level of fluency in each of these key areas. It introduces students to a variety of contemporary literary genres. Weekly readings and discussions will be on short stories, poems, and dramatic sketches from representative authors. These readings focus on various social, cultural, political, and historical aspects of Indian society. Students are encouraged to explore these issues in their written assignments as well as in their class discussions. Written assignments on themes suggested by the reading will be required. Students will also work on advanced grammar and special emphasis will be on vocabulary building, idioms, and problems of syntax. There will be advanced exercises in composition. The class will be conducted entirely in Hindi and students will acquire language skills sufficient to approach literary texts on their own.

Note: This course can be repeated for credit.

 

HINDI - Hindi Literature

Canceled
HINURD 221
DWIN104
Tu 2-4:59P
4.0
15296
Paramasivan, Vasudha

INDONESIAN - Introductory Indonesian

MALAYI 1A
DWIN189
MW 10-11:59A & F 10-10:59A
5.0
16612
Lunde, Ninik

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

Indonesian 1A introduces students to elementary Indonesian conversation and develops reading and writing commensurate with the students’ abilities. This class provides  students with the skills to express words and phrases such as greeting people, leave taking, talking about oneself or family, indicating time, asking and giving directions, asking about basic everyday activities, describing various objects, expressing emotions, etc. This level provides students the skills needed to use a limited range of Indonesian language, adequate for basic communication.

 

INDONESIAN - Intermediate Indonesian

MALAYI 100A
BARR76 & DWIN134
MW 12-1:59P & F 12-12:59P
5.0
16523
Lunde, Ninik

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

Indonesian 1A and 1B are prerequisite for Indonesian 100A, or with the approval of the instructor.

This course provides readings in Indonesian text books, newspapers, journals, and literature. This class provides students with the skills needed to use Indonesian adequately in familiar situations and to communicate general messages. Students will be expected to be more skilled to speak Indonesian with sufficient structural accuracy and vocabulary to participate in most formal and informal conversations on practical, social, and professional topics.

 

INDONESIAN - Intermediate Indonesian

MALAYI 100A
DWIN134 & DWIN189
TTh 10-11:59A & F 11-11:59A
5.0
16524
Lunde, Ninik

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

Indonesian 1A and 1B are prerequisite for Indonesian 100A, or with the approval of the instructor.

This course provides readings in Indonesian text books, newspapers, journals, and literature. This class provides students with the skills needed to use Indonesian adequately in familiar situations and to communicate general messages. Students will be expected to be more skilled to speak Indonesian with sufficient structural accuracy and vocabulary to participate in most formal and informal conversations on practical, social, and professional topics.

KHMER - Introductory Khmer

KHMER 1A
DWIN33
MTWThF 2-2:59P
5.0
16098
Smith, Frank

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

This class will provide students with basic speaking, listening, reading and writing proficiency in modern standard Khmer, the major language spoken in Cambodia.  The emphasis will be 60% speaking/listening and 40% reading/writing.  Students will achieve a "survival level" of conversation and ability to use the writing system, using topics such as pleasantries and introductions, family and friends, the classroom, and food.  No previous knowledge of Khmer is necessary.

 

KHMER - Intermediate Khmer

KHMER 100A
DWIN33
MTWTh 4-5:29P
5.0
16087
Smith, Frank

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

 

This class is intended for students who have already attained a "survival level" of spoken competence in Khmer language.  No previous knowledge of the writing system is necessary.  Students will learn the basics of Khmer reading and writing, and how to express themselves more subtly, coherently, and formally in the spoken language.  Students will also be given a basic foundation in several areas of cultural and linguistic knowledge shared by all adults in Cambodia: proper classroom language, Therevada Buddhism, and public information (such as news and advertising media).

 

KHMER - Advanced Khmer

KHMER 101A
DWIN33
MW 9-10:30A
3.0
22561
Smith, Frank

This course is intended for students who are already competent in the Khmer writing system (students should already be able to write short narratives about themselves and topics of interest, and be able to read folk tales, short stories and news articles).  Students should be conversant in a variety of topics known by Cambodian adults: religion, public informational media, politics and history, popular literature.  In this course, students will deepen their conversational and reading knowledge of all of these topics, and read (and discuss) progressively more difficult texts. 

MALAY - Seminar in Malay Letters and Oral Traditions

MALAYI 210A
DWIN204
W 3-5:59P
4.0
16613
Tiwon, Sylvia

Various aspects of Indonesian/Malay language and literature, history and development of the language, classical literature, drama, oral literature, modern literature of Indonesia and Malaysia, and dialect studies. Applies various theoretical approaches to the study of the language and literature. 

Topic for Fall 2017 : Language, Lies and the ambiguity of reading.

Language instruction -- and especially advanced language instruction -- is generally conducted on the notion of legibility and a semblance of transparency.   Yet, ambiguity, concealment, imitative malfunction, and even outright dissemblance are all ingredients involved in the discursive act and contribute to the richness of a language. Irony, parody and humor often present some of the greatest obstacles to comprehension: is there a "grammar" of irony (or of parody, sarcasm, even humor) that would help us overcome this obstacle?  

This semester focuses on the act of reading in Indonesian. We will develop a set of methods and tools to help us read, analyze and interpret a variety of texts in Indonesian and/or Malay. We will approach the text as a link between author and audience against the broader social, cultural and political environment. Useful concepts will include: ethos, authority and intentionality, internal and external audience

Readings: we will begin by reading a selection of essays in contemporary Indonesian including material from journals such as Tempo and the newspapers.   From these we will look at the formation of arguments, assumptions made (whether shared or otherwise), local techniques of persuasion and what happens when persuasion begins to break down.   The bulk of the readings will be in Indonesian, some assigned, some chosen individually or by the group.

 Additional readings in English on language, literature and politics; 

Benedict Anderson, Language and Power
Alton L. Becker, Writing on the Tongue
Laurie Sears, Situated Testimonies

PUNJABI - Introductory Punjabi

PUNJABI 1A
DWIN189
TTh 9:30-10:59A
5.0
20248
Ubhi, Upkar

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

Gurmukhi script. Survey of grammar. Graded exercises, leading to a mastery of basic language patterns, essential vocabulary, and achievement of basic reading and writing skills.

Lab

Section Day/Time Room Instructor Class #
101 LAB F 10-11:59A DWINB4 Ubhi, Upkar 422365

PUNJABI - Intermediate Punjabi

PUNJABI 100A
DWIN263
TTh 11-12:29P
5.0
20336
Ubhi, Upkar

Focus on reading, writing and speaking Punjabi more fluently in formal and informal contexts. Selected readings vary every semester. These form the starting point to stimulate students' own writings which include a long interview with a Punjabi elder from the wider community. These may be recorded in the students' own voices and form a contribution to the ongoing "Punjabi Voices" project. Review of grammar provided as needed in addition to the introduction of more complex grammatical structures. Grading based on performance in class and final presentation, weekly quizzes, two midterms, and a final.

Lab

Section Day/Time Room Instructor Class #
101 LAB F 10-11:59A DWINB4 Ubhi, Upkar 22366

SANSKRIT - Elementary Sanskrit

SANSKR 100A
DWIN205
MWF 8-9:59A
5.0
20254
Goldman, Sally

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

The focus of Sanskrit 100AB is to introduce students to Sanskrit grammar, with a goal of developing the skills necessary to speak and read basic, simple Sanskrit texts. Sanskrit 101A covers lessons 1–12 of the Devavāṇīpraveśikā [Robert P. Goldman and Sally J. Sutherland Goldman, 2004], including, the script, sandhi, the present system [vartamāne prayoga], the karmaṇi and bhāve prayoga-s, the laṭ, laṅ, and the loṭ, and bhūte kṛdanta-s, and past active participles, nominal stems  in –a/ā, i/ī, u/ū, an, aḥ, iḥ, uḥ, ant, [t]ṛ, and in [for all genders]. Also covered are participles, relative and correlative constructions, questions, and a number of idioms, as well as tatpuruṣa [including nañ, prādi and gati, and upapada samāsas] and karmadhāraya samāsas. Students are expected to memorize for recitation one or more verses per week. Emphasis is placed on correct prosody and pronunciation. Simple conversation is also introduced. The class meets for six hours each week. The first twenty minutes of each class are spent in oral drills and recitation, replacing the traditional language lab. The next hour is spent in intense grammatical instruction and practice, the final thirty minutes of class are practice in speaking, reading andwriting in Sanskrit. There is daily homework and memorization. Attendance is required. There are two quizzes, two mid-term exams, and a final exam. No prior knowledge of Sanskrit is required.

 

SANSKRIT - Intermediate Sanskrit: Sāhitya (Literary Sanskrit)

SANSKR 101C
DWIN205
MF 12-1:59P
5.0
44267
Goldman, Sally

Prerequisite:  Sanskrit 100AB or equivalent. 

Sanskri101C introduces students to classical literary Sanskrit (sāhitya) and commentary, where available. An extended passage of a kāvya and/or an entire play (nāṭaka) is read. Works of Kālidāsa, Bhāsa, and the like are normally read. Developing strong reading skills is the focus of the class. Students develop skills to use hard copy and web based resources. Grammar is reviewed and explained as needed. Students are also introduced to current scholarship and trends in literary analysis. Students are expected to memorize at least one verse per class. Emphasis is placed on correct prosody and pronunciation. Submission of an annotated translation project, assigned in class, is required. Course content changes every semester and may be repeated for credit.

 

SANSKRIT - Sanskrit Literature

SANSKR 200A
DWIN346B
MF 2-3:30P
4.0
20265
Goldman, Robert

TAMIL - Introductory Tamil

TAMIL 1A
DWIN189 & DWIN106
TTh 11-12:29P & 10:00A-11:59A
5.0
21026
Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

This introductory level course focuses on progressive acquisition of language skills to communicate effectively in both written and spoken Tamil. It facilitates development of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing competence along with basic grammar.

 

TAMIL - Readings in Tamil

TAMIL 101A
DWIN233
TTh 2-3:29P
4.0
21225
Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

Excerpts from contemporary short stories, novels, prose and other forms of Tamil literature authored by popular Tamil writers will be used as reading material. Films will be used as supplementary material for discussions.

Lab

Section Day/Time Room Instructor Class #
101 LAB W 1-1:59PDWIN204 Sankara Rajulu, Bharathyr 21226

TAMIL - Seminar in Tamil Literature

Canceled
TAMIL 210A
DWIN210
Th 2-4:59P
4.0
21185
Clare, Jennifer

TELUGU - Elementary Telugu

TELUGU 1A
DWIN233 & HAVI214
TTh 12:30-1:59P & W 12-12:59P
4.0
21301
Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

This elementary level course focuses on progressive acquisition of language skills to communicate effectively in Telugu. It facilitates development of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing competence along with basic grammar.

THAI - Introduction to Thai

THAI 1A
DWIN189 & DWIN262
MF 5-6:29P & W 5-6:59P
5.0
21298
Chowchuvech, Supatra

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

This is an introductory course designed for students who have little or no knowledge of Thai language, either spoken or written. The emphasis of this course is on verbal skills and conversation. Students will be introduced to the language through conversation practice on common themes that they will likely encounter in everyday life, along with vocabulary and  grammar  around such themes. Phonetic transcription system will be relied on while students are being  introduced to the Thai alphabets and syllable construction rules. The class is enhanced with audio visual accompaniment, songs,  video, role play, occasional field trips. The material and class discussion is designed to expose students to the world of the Thais.

Heritage students who speak Thai well and are familiar with Thai alphabet must meet with instructor  for  evaluation for possible placement in Thai 1B, a beginner course, in the spring semester. 

Pre-requisite: None.

URDU - Introductory Urdu

HINURD 2A
DWIN232
MTWThF 10-10:59A
5.0
15188
Bruce, Gregory Maxwell

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

URDU - Intermediate Urdu

HINURD 103A
EVAN35
MWF 11-11:59A
4.0
15082
Bruce, Gregory Maxwell

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

URDU - Advanced Urdu

HINURD 104A
DWIN210
MWF 1-1:59P
3.0
44702
Bruce, Gregory Maxwell

VIETNAMESE - Introductory Vietnamese

VIETNMS 1A
DWIN106
MTWThF 11-11:59A
5.0
21054
Tran, Hanh

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

An introduction to modern spoken and written Vietnamese, including intensive drill on basic phonology and grammar. The first semester emphasizes phonetic concepts, syllable formations and tonal distinctions along with simple sentence structures in everyday topics. By the end of the second semester, students should be able to function successfully in ordinary Vietnamese conversation and read simple texts of moderate difficulty.

VIETNAMESE - Introductory Vietnamese

VIETNMS 1A
EVAN35
MTWThF 12-12:59P
5.0
21055
Tran, Hanh

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

An introduction to modern spoken and written Vietnamese, including intensive drill on basic phonology and grammar. The first semester emphasizes phonetic concepts, syllable formations and tonal distinctions along with simple sentence structures in everyday topics. By the end of the second semester, students should be able to function successfully in ordinary Vietnamese conversation and read simple texts of moderate difficulty.

VIETNAMESE - Intermediate Vietnamese

VIETNMS 100A
EVAN51
MTWThF 1-1:59P
5.0
21744
Tran, Hanh

Students may not take language courses at a lower level than they have been assessed at, nor than the level of other courses in the same language that they have successfully completed previously.

A second-year course in Vietnamese vocabulary and syntax with intensive drills on short colloquial expressions and auditory recognition of speech patterns. First semester course stresses phraseology, sentence building, rules of composition and development of students' communicative skills. By the end of the second semester students will learn to speak and write simple compositions and will have a cursory introduction to Vietnamese literature and sample readings from contemporary Vietnamese writers.

VIETNAMESE - Advanced Vietnamese

VIETNMS 101A
DWIN225
MWF 2-2:59P
3.0
20828
Nguyen, Cam

THAI Intermediate

SSEASN 100A
DWIN33 & DWINB33B
MTWT 7:45-8:45am & F 8-9pm
5
67280
Edwards, Penelope

Intermediate Thai

SSEASN - Freshman Seminar: Southeast Asia by Mail: The Lost Arts of Letter Writing

SSEASN 24
DWIN210
M 4-4:59P
1.0
59222
Edwards, Penelope

This new freshman seminar explores Southeast Asia through letters – actual and fictional, poetic and political, prosaic and musical.    We will consider the form and function of letters, and their use as historical sources, private expression, and literary genre.  In the age of tweets and “hey professor!”, we will also discuss the disappearing etiquette of letter-writing.

Each week, students will receive a different letter(s) introducing them to different parts, pasts and voices of/from/to Southeast Asia. 40% of your grade will be based on participation & discussion, and 60% on written work comprising 12 letters responding to the readings of the week. 

Our readings include 19th century letters by the Burmese monk Ledi Sayadaw and the Indonesian princess Kartini, excerpts from Michio Takeyama’s  1950s novel Harp of Burma, Botan’s 1960’s novel Letters from ThailandLetters Home by 1990s Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, and contemporary work by Hmong American poets Khaty Xiong and Mai Der Vang. We will also read private letters from Southeast Asian and European archives.  We will also consider poetry, prose and song by Benedict Anderson, W. H. Auden, Eavan Boland, Jimmy Cliff, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Wilkie Collins, Eminem, Herman Hesse, Yusuf Komunyakaa and Natasha Tretheway.

 

Dept/Crs Sec Titlesort icon Instructor Days/Times Location CCN
VIETNMS 1A 001 VIETNAMESE - Introductory Vietnamese Tran, Hanh MTWThF 11-11:59A DWIN106 21054
VIETNMS 1A 002 VIETNAMESE - Introductory Vietnamese Tran, Hanh MTWThF 12-12:59P EVAN35 21055
VIETNMS 100A 001 VIETNAMESE - Intermediate Vietnamese Tran, Hanh MTWThF 1-1:59P EVAN51 21744
VIETNMS 101A 001 VIETNAMESE - Advanced Vietnamese Nguyen, Cam MWF 2-2:59P DWIN225 20828
HINURD 2A 001 URDU - Introductory Urdu Bruce, Gregory Maxwell MTWThF 10-10:59A DWIN232 15188
HINURD 103A 001 URDU - Intermediate Urdu Bruce, Gregory Maxwell MWF 11-11:59A EVAN35 15082
HINURD 104A 001 URDU - Advanced Urdu Bruce, Gregory Maxwell MWF 1-1:59P DWIN210 44702
SSEASN 100A 001 THAI Intermediate
Edwards, Penelope
Chowchuvech, Supatra
MTWT 7:45-8:45am & F 8-9pm DWIN33 & DWINB33B 67280
THAI 1A 001 THAI - Introduction to Thai Chowchuvech, Supatra MF 5-6:29P & W 5-6:59P DWIN189 & DWIN262 21298
TELUGU 1A 001 TELUGU - Elementary Telugu Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy TTh 12:30-1:59P & W 12-12:59P DWIN233 & HAVI214 21301
TAMIL 210A 001 TAMIL - Seminar in Tamil Literature Clare, Jennifer Th 2-4:59P DWIN210 21185
TAMIL 101A 001 TAMIL - Readings in Tamil Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy TTh 2-3:29P DWIN233 21225
TAMIL 1A 001 TAMIL - Introductory Tamil Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy TTh 11-12:29P & 10:00A-11:59A DWIN189 & DWIN106 21026
SSEASN 84 001 SSEASN - SOPHOMORE SEMINAR - Southeast Asian Film
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi
Tran, Hanh
F 2-3:59P DWIN233 21457
SSEASN 250 002 SSEASN - Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Studies Faruqui, Munis W 3-5:59P DWIN210 22192
SSEASN 250 003 SSEASN - Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Studies Edwards, Penelope Tu 3-5:59P DWIN210 22040
SSEASN R5A 001 SSEASN - Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition) Scalice, Joseph MWF 11-11:59A EVAN7 20280
SSEASN R5A 002 SSEASN - Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition) Scalice, Joseph MWF 12-12:59P EVAN47 21396
SSEASN R5A 003 SSEASN - Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition) The Staff MWF 1-1:59P EVAN7 21397
SSEASN R5A 004 SSEASN - Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition) Collins, Rebekah TTh 9:30-10:59A DWIN228 45283
SSEASN 120 001 SSEASN - Islam, Gender and the State in Southeast Asia Tiwon, Sylvia TTh 3:30 - 4:59P DWIN209 44557
SSEASN C52 001 SSEASN - Introduction to the Study of Buddhism Sharf, Robert MWF 1-1:59P VLSB2060 22046
SSEASN 24 001 SSEASN - Freshman Seminar: Southeast Asia by Mail: The Lost Arts of Letter Writing Edwards, Penelope M 4-4:59P DWIN210 59222
SEASIAN 10A 001 SEASIAN - Introduction to the Civilization of Southeast Asia Edwards, Penelope TTh 12:30-1:59P DWIN88 20766
SASIAN C114 001 SASIAN - Tibetan Buddhism Ronis, Jann TTh 2-3:29P DWIN205 22053
SASIAN 128 001 SASIAN - Religion in Modern India Paramasivan, Vasudha TTh 11-12:59P BARR587 44536
SASIAN C224 001 SASIAN - Readings in Tibetan Buddhist Texts Soerensen,Per K M 3-5:59P DWIN288 20301
SASIAN C215 001 SASIAN - Readings in Indian Buddhist Texts von Rospatt, Alexander W 3-5:59P DWIN288 22886
SASIAN 144 001 SASIAN - Islam in South Asia Faruqui, Munis TTh 11-12:59P DWIN109 44397
SASIAN 1A 001 SASIAN - Introduction to the Civilization of Early India Clare, Jennifer MWF 1-1:59P MOFF101 20322
SASIAN 140 001 SASIAN - Hindu Mythology Gonzalez-Reimann, Luis MWF 11-11:59A DWIN145 21921
SASIAN R5A 001 SASIAN - Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition) Whittington, Rebecca MWF 12-12:59P DWIN225 20390
SASIAN R5A 002 SASIAN - Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition) Archambault , Hannah MWF 1-1:59P VLSB2070 20391
SASIAN R5A 003 SASIAN - Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition) The Staff MWF 2-2:59P DWIN211 20392
SASIAN R5A 004 SASIAN - Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition) Paul, Abhijeet TTh 11-12:59P DWIN263 45285
SASIAN C113 001 SASIAN - Buddhist Thought in India The Staff Th 9:30-10:59A BARR104 22656
SANSKR 200A 001 SANSKRIT - Sanskrit Literature Goldman, Robert MF 2-3:30P DWIN346B 20265
SANSKR 101C 001 SANSKRIT - Intermediate Sanskrit: Sāhitya (Literary Sanskrit) Goldman, Sally MF 12-1:59P DWIN205 44267
SANSKR 100A 001 SANSKRIT - Elementary Sanskrit Goldman, Sally MWF 8-9:59A DWIN205 20254
PUNJABI 1A 001 PUNJABI - Introductory Punjabi Ubhi, Upkar TTh 9:30-10:59A DWIN189 20248
PUNJABI 100A 001 PUNJABI - Intermediate Punjabi Ubhi, Upkar TTh 11-12:29P DWIN263 20336
MALAYI 210A 001 MALAY - Seminar in Malay Letters and Oral Traditions Tiwon, Sylvia W 3-5:59P DWIN204 16613
KHMER 1A 001 KHMER - Introductory Khmer Smith, Frank MTWThF 2-2:59P DWIN33 16098
KHMER 100A 001 KHMER - Intermediate Khmer Smith, Frank MTWTh 4-5:29P DWIN33 16087
KHMER 101A 001 KHMER - Advanced Khmer Smith, Frank MW 9-10:30A DWIN33 22561
MALAYI 1A 001 INDONESIAN - Introductory Indonesian Lunde, Ninik MW 10-11:59A & F 10-10:59A DWIN189 16612
MALAYI 100A 001 INDONESIAN - Intermediate Indonesian Lunde, Ninik MW 12-1:59P & F 12-12:59P BARR76 & DWIN134 16523
MALAYI 100A 002 INDONESIAN - Intermediate Indonesian Lunde, Ninik TTh 10-11:59A & F 11-11:59A DWIN134 & DWIN189 16524
HINURD 101A 001 HINDI - Readings in Modern Hindi Jain, Usha TTh 11-12:29P DWIN210 15146
HINURD 1A 001 HINDI - Introductory Hindi Sirasao, Pranjali MTWThF 10-10:59A DWIN235 15281
HINURD 1A 002 HINDI - Introductory Hindi Sirasao, Pranjali MTWThF 11-11:59A DWIN235 15282
HINURD 100A 001 HINDI - Intermediate Hindi Sirasao, Pranjali MWF 12-12:59P DWIN187 15090
HINURD 221 001 HINDI - Hindi Literature Paramasivan, Vasudha Tu 2-4:59P DWIN104 15296
FILIPN W1X 001 FILIPINO - Introductory Filipino for Heritage Learners Online Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi MW 4-5:29P & F 4-5:59P ONLINE 22851
FILIPN 1A 001 FILIPINO - Introductory Filipino Aban, Cynthia MTWThF 11-11:59A DWIN262 14797
FILIPN 1A 002 FILIPINO - Introductory Filipino Aban, Cynthia MTWThF 12-12:59P DWIN262 14798
FILIPN 1A 003 FILIPINO - Introductory Filipino Aban, Cynthia MTWThF 1-1:59P DWIN262 14799
FILIPN W100A 001 FILIPINO - Intermediate Filipino Online Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi TTh 9:30-10:59A & F 10-11:59P ONLINE
FILIPN 100A 001 FILIPINO - Intermediate Filipino Llagas, Karen TTh 12:30-1:59P & F 12-1:59P DWIN189 & DWIN163 14767
FILIPN 100A 002 FILIPINO - Intermediate Filipino Llagas, Karen TTh 2-3:29P & F 2-3:59P DWIN89 & DWIN189 14768
FILIPN 101A 001 FILIPINO - Advanced Filipino Online Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi TTh 11-12:29P LATI121 66877
BURMESE 1A 001 BURMESE - Introductory Burmese Wong, Kenneth WTh 4-5:59P & F 4-4:59P DWIN233 & DWIN104 22450
BANGLA 1A 001 BENGALI - Introductory Bengali Basu, Amitabha MW 12-1:59P DWIN106 44266