Courses

Fall 2016

Begins on: 
August 24, 2016

Introduction to the Civilization of Early India

SASIAN 1A
BARR20
MWF 1-1:59P
4
23064
von Rospatt, Alexander

Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition)

SASIAN R5A
DWIN210
MWF 12-12:59P
4
23175
Whittington, Rebecca

Thinking in and beyond a time of rapidly digitizing production, consumption, and circulation of texts, what does it mean, and has it meant, to make a book by hand or using analog or hybrid technologies? How can the verbal, visual, and material aspects of a book express or embody change, memory, narrative, and thought? How can the making of a book reveal the connections and disconnects between craftspeople (including writers), local communities, and “global” consumers?

In this course, we will try to answer these questions by engaging two regional literary traditions, Bengali and Tamil, and exploring bookmaking practices and forms. We will read works in a variety of formats that draw diversely on traditional narratives, as well as historical and critical works. In addition to practicing and developing basic college-level academic writing skills, we will do simple hands-on bookmaking activities to experiment with writing on a material level. If possible, we may make a field trip to a local letterpress printer and/or have guest speakers who are practitioners of the book arts.

 

Great Books of India (South Asian Reading and Composition)

SASIAN R5A
DWIN210
MWF 1-1:59P
4
23176
Gomez, Kashi

What is Sanskrit literature?

It has something to do with religion—the Vedas and all that, right? And then there is the Ramayan, the Mahabharat and that Kalidasa guy…

Even the 8th century Sanskrit poet, Dharmakīrti, had trouble getting out from under the shadow of the epics, the Rāmāyaṇa and Mahābhārata:

Vālmīki dammed the sea with rocks 
put into place by monkeys,
and Vyāsa filled it with the arrows shot by Pārtha;
yet neither is suspected of hyperbole.
On the other hand, I weigh both word and sense
And yet the public sneers and scorns my work
O Reputation, I salute thee![1]

This course will expose you to a wide range of styles and genres from classical Sanskrit literature at the height of its prominence as a literary medium (1st to 12th century CE). We will read stories of love, works for the stage, political thrillers, historical chronicles, and vulgar satire. You will find some of the works thrilling and others tedious. The primary goals for this course are 1) to move beyond our personal tastes and probe the texts with an open mind 2) To learn how to ground analysis and interpretation in cultural and historical context so that we can start asking questions like: Why does this literature matter? For whom did it matter? Why would someone write this text; where does it fit within the larger tradition of Sanskrit literature?



[1] Ingalls, Sanskrit Poetry, from Vidyākara’s Treasury, 316 vs. 1726. Translated by Daniel Ingalls.

 

Great Books of India (South Asian Reading and Composition)

SASIAN R5A
HPAV141
MWF 2-2:59P
4
23177
Anderson, Kris

Tibetan Buddhism

SASIAN C114
BARR587
TTh 11-12:29P
4
31780
Ronis, Jann

Religion in Modern India

SASIAN 128
VLSB2011
TTh 12:30-1:59P
4
31590
Paramasivan, Vasudha

This course considers the co-option, reinterpretation and dissemination of sacred texts and religious practices in various political and cultural projects in India during the colonial and post-colonial periods. Students will be introduced to religious “reform” movements and cross-cultural debates during the colonial period. We will also examine how the concept of a secular state in post-Independence India has shaped and continues to shape religious practice and public policy. Important themes will include, transformations in the role of women, debates around caste and “untouchability”, and religious conversions. Although the emphasis is on Hindu traditions, attention will also be given to other Indian traditions such as Islam, Christianity and Buddhism.

Hindu Mythology

SASIAN 140
VLSB2060
MWF 11-11:59A
4
31585
Goldman, Robert

Indian Buddhist Textsq

SASIAN C215
DWIN288
W 3-5:59P
2-4
23031
von Rospatt, Alexander

Tibetan Buddhist Texts

SASIAN C224
DWIN288
Th 2-4:59P
2-4
23018
Dalton, Jacob

Introduction to the Civilization of Southeast Asia

SEASIAN 10A
BARR59
TTh 2-3:29P
4
23593
Edwards, Penelope

Articulations of the Female in Indonesia

SEASIAN 130
DWIN187
TTh 3:30-4:59P
4
31577
Tiwon, Sylvia

This course examines the impact of the history of literacy and literature upon the ways in which perceptions and roles of women are constructed and reinforced in a developing non-Western society. Course material includes literature, oral and manuscript narratives, ritual performance.

Islam and Society in Southeast Asia

SEASIAN 137
DWIN209
TTh 12:30-1:59P
4
31587
Hadler, Jeffery

Indonesia is the nation with the world’s largest Muslim population, and Malaysia and the southern Philippines are regions with vibrant Islamic traditions. Islam has been essential in the development of Southeast Asian cultures, literatures, and arts for over seven hundred years, and Southeast Asian Islam is intimately tied to the Islamic world. This upper-division undergraduate course will be an investigation into key discourses on the cultures and politics of Islam in Southeast Asia. We will trace the processes through which Islam entered the Malay world in the 13th century. We will explore the European colonial encounters with Islam in Southeast Asia and the ways that Islam interacted with and resisted colonialism. We will discuss the role of mysticism and Sufi associations, and of reformist movements in the 18th through the 21st centuries. And we will analyze the place of Islam in Southeast Asian arts and literature. We will consider the majority Muslim nations of Indonesia and Malaysia, and will also explore the struggles of Islam as a minority religion in the Philippines and Thailand. Readings will include primary sources in translation, literary texts, ethnographic works, and writings by colonial and local scholars. Note: this course is writing-intensive and discussion-based.

Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition)

SSEASN R5A
DWIN211
MWF 11-11:59A
4
22980
Scalice, Joseph

Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition)

SSEASN R5A
DWIN235
MWF 12-12:59P
4
24366
Collins, Rebecca

Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition)

SSEASN R5A
HPAV141
MWF 1-1:59P
4
24367
Hewitt, Megan

What histories and cultural interactions influence the ways in which we view Southeast Asia today?  What can the study of literature and other artistic forms teach us about such a culturally diverse region of the world? In this course, we will explore these questions by engaging with a variety of Southeast Asian literatures in English Translation. By reading short stories, novels, plays, a graphic novel, poetry and topical essays, we will work to situate each text contextually within local and global histories of Southeast Asia. Throughout the semester we will cover topics relating to the construction of Southeast Asia as a region and as an area of academic study, questions of identity and nation formation, impacts of colonialism, as well as histories of resistance and revolution. Through the interrogation of cultural representations, students will develop the skills of observation, comparison and analysis in order to read critically, write persuasively and think analytically in an academic context.

FRESHMAN SEMINAR

SSEASN 24
DWIN211
M 4-4:59P
1
31754
Edwards, Penelope

Introduction to Buddhism

SSEASN C52
TBA
4
31773
THE STAFF

SOPHOMORE SEMINAR - Southeast Asian Film

SSEASN 84
DWIN262
F 4-5:59
1-2
24470
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi

In this seminar we will examine contemporary Southeast Asian society and culture through the lens of contemporary Southeast Asian films from two countries -- Vietnam and the Philippines.  In discussions about the films in class we will seek to understand how these films mirror modern and traditional aspects of the societies in which they were produced.  We will also consider the films as examples of current world cinema and vehicles of storytelling.  In their four page papers for each section of the course, students will address the above broad issues (referencing class discussions when appropriate) in relation to their own experiences and opinions, focusing either on one film or comparing two or three from the same country.

 

Philippine Myths, Legends, Poetry and Epics

Canceled
SSEASN 120
DWIN215
TTh 11-12:29P
4
22955
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi

How do you explain the creation of the world?  Do you quote scientific explanations, or tell a story anchored on your religious beliefs, or do you have your own version? This course looks into the way pre-colonial Filipinos “explained” their “world” (mountains, rivers, seas, rain and storms, plants and animals), narrated their stories,  and expressed their beliefs, feelings, and values.  We will be reading Philippine myths, legends, poetry and epics.  This includes traditional narrative forms such as the alamat (legends) and the kuwentong-bayan (folktales) and poetic forms such as the  ambahan, diona, and tanaga.   Among the questions the course explores are:  How can we understand the way of life and belief systems of the ethnolinguistic groups of the Philippines through their literatures? How do the dynamics between orality and literacy come into play in these Filipino literary texts? How have traditional forms been revitalized and transformed by writers  to articulate contemporary concerns such as poverty, land reform, women’s issues, and human rights?

TOPICS IN SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES

SSEASN 120
DWIN109
TTh 12:30-1:59P
4
22957
The Staff

GRADUATE SEMINAR - Southeast Asia History Theory

SSEASN 250
BARR115
M 3-5:59P
2-4
23089
Hadler, Jeffery

 

This graduate seminar will be an introduction to debates and current research on the histories, cultures, and literatures of Southeast Asia. We will discuss historiographical efforts to conceptualize and teach about the region as a bounded field of study. Attention will be paid to the different approaches that Southeast Asian, European, American, and Japanese scholarship have taken to Southeast Asian Studies. We will analyze the place of religion, of race, of colonialism, of “the Chinese” and other minorities, of gender, and of pre-colonial “tradition” in Southeast Asianist discourse.

 

GRADUATE SEMINAR - Islam in Medieval South Asia

SSEASN 250
BARR129
M 2-4:59P
2-4
32036
Faruqui, Munis

 

Drawing on a broad cross-section of theoretical and methodological approaches this course will interrogate some of the key historiographical debates that have shaped our understanding of the place of Islam and Muslims in pre-1750 Indian history. This class expects participants to not only consider the ways in which knowledge gets constituted and its impacts (both within academia and beyond) but also the question of historical method itself. Themes to be considered (among others): conversion, iconoclasm, religious identity, state formation, kingship, literary cultures, visual cultures,  subalterns, gender, and decline.

 

GRADUATE SEMINAR IN SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES

SSEASN 250
DWIN204
Th 4-6:59P
2-4
31753
Edwards, Penelope

METHODS AND PROBLEMS IN TEACHING SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES

SSEASN 375
BARR102
W 3-5:59P
4
34293
Faruqui, Munis

This course prepares graduate students to teach both R & C and our gateway courses, consolidating skills and developing confidence in the classroom. The course will give students practical experience in creating and adapting materials for use in the classroom, while consolidating their understanding of the basic principles of teaching university-level reading and writing. This seminar is discussion based and is centered on student participation and in-class presentations by participants. There will be no “lecture” style presentations, but there will be class visits from on-campus and off-campus specialists in the teaching of writing and reading. This course will also deal with such practical matters as where and how to find resources on campus, how to structure class time, how to lead a discussion, how to use campus learning websites, how to create writing assignments and teach writing, and how to develop effective assessment that at once contributes to and can allow assessment of, a student’s attainment of course learning objectives. This course qualifies for the GSI Teaching and Resource Center's Certificate of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

BENGALI - Intermediate

BANGLA 101A
DWIN175
MW 12-1:59P & F 12-12:59P
5
31583
Basu, Amitabha

BURMESE - Introductory

BURMESE 1A
DWIN104
WTh 4-5:59P & F 4-4:59P
5
32929
Wong, Kenneth

FILIPINO - Introductory

FILIPN 1A
BARR80
MTWThF 11-11:59A
5
15719
Aban, Cynthia

FILIPINO - Introductory

FILIPN 1A
DWIN206
MTWThF 12-12:59P
5
15723
Aban, Cynthia

FILIPINO - Introductory

FILIPN 1A
DWIN106
MTWThF 1-1:59P
5
15724
Aban, Cynthia

FILIPINO - Introductory

FILIPN W1X
DWIN251 ONLINE
MW 4-5:59P & F 3-3:59P
5
34275
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi

This is a beginners’ class with emphasis on the four basic skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The course uses the functional approach in learning a language. The students focus on basic conversational  skills in Filipino.  At the end of the  course, they should be able to use Filipino in greetings and situations such as visiting a friend’s house, shopping, telling the time, making an appointment, asking and giving directions, and going to a medical clinic.  They should also be able to use Filipino in: describing people, objects, and places;  narrating an event or simple story;  expressing feelings; and expressing agreement or disagreement.

FILIPINO - Intermediate

FILIPN 100A
DWIN79 DWIN243
TTh 12:30-1:59P & F 12-1:59P
5
15655
Llagas, Karen

FILIPINO - Intermediate

FILIPN 100A
DWIN106 DWIN235
TTh 2-3:29P & F 2-3:59P
5
15656
Llagas, Karen

FILIPINO - Advanced Online

FILIPN W101A
ONLINE
TTh 9:30-10:59A & F 8-9:59A
3
15514
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi

Why do you use a language? Would you like to read more Filipino academic or literary texts, watch a Filipino soap opera of film without subtitles, or perhaps be able to translate and interpret? In this class, we will learn more about the Filipino language and Philippine society through short articles, essays and literary texts.  These texts, available only in Tagalog/Filipino,  will also provide us with an overview of Philippine history and society.  Moreover, we will be working with  examples of the changing orthography of the Filipino language through texts that range from 19th-century Tagalog, 1950s Pilipino, and 1990s Filipino. Among our learning strategies are listening/watching authentic video/audio texts, and writing essays/creative work.

 

HINDI - Introductory

HINURD 1A
BARR50
MTWThF 11-11:59A
5
16709
Sirasao, Pranjali

This course emphasizes development of the full range of Hindi language skills: reading, listening, comprehension, the use of grammatical structures, and oral and written communication—through a variety of learning themes. Individual and small group activities, interactive work and multimedia-based activities reinforce language skills and provide the platform for adapting the curriculum to specific student learning goals. Use of graded exercises and readings drawn from Hindi literature, leads to the mastery of grammatical structures, essential vocabulary and achievement of basic reading and writing competence.

HINDI - Introductory

HINURD 1A
DWIN106
MTWThF 12-12:59P
5
16710
Sirasao, Pranjali

This course emphasizes development of the full range of Hindi language skills: reading, listening, comprehension, the use of grammatical structures, and oral and written communication—through a variety of learning themes. Individual and small group activities, interactive work and multimedia-based activities reinforce language skills and provide the platform for adapting the curriculum to specific student learning goals. Use of graded exercises and readings drawn from Hindi literature, leads to the mastery of grammatical structures, essential vocabulary and achievement of basic reading and writing competence.

HINDI - Intermediate

HINURD 100A
DWIN130
MWF 10-10:59P
4
16390
Sirasao, Pranjali

 

Intermediate language course will focus on expanding all language skills (reading, writing, speaking), mastering grammar patterns and new vocabulary through authentic readings from classical and contemporary Hindi literature, epics, mythology and current events. This course acquaints students with representative readings from Hindi texts on pivotal cultural issues from a wide variety of sources, to enable them to acquire cultural competence in the language. Systematic training in advanced grammar and syntax, reinforced by exercises in composition, both oral and written will be integral part of the course. Special attention is given towards developing communication skills through audio/video, digital media and current events. Second year sequence requires completion of the first year course or consent of the instructor.

 

HINDI - Advanced, Readings in Modern Hindi

HINURD 101A
DWIN370
MWF 12-12:59P
3
16490
Jain, Usha

This course is designed for students who have already achieved an intermediate level of proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing Hindi. Its objective is to move students toward a greater level of fluency in each of these key areas. It introduces students to a variety of contemporary literary genres. Weekly readings and discussions will be on short stories, poems, and dramatic sketches from representative authors. These readings focus on various social, cultural, political, and historical aspects of Indian society. Students are encouraged to explore these issues in their written assignments as well as in their class discussions. Written assignments on themes suggested by the reading will be required. Students will also work on advanced grammar and special emphasis will be on vocabulary building, idioms, and problems of syntax. There will be advanced exercises in composition. The class will be conducted entirely in Hindi and students will acquire language skills sufficient to approach literary texts on their own.

Note: This course can be repeated for credit.

HINDI - Graduate Hindi Literature

HINURD 221
DWIN358A
Tu 2-4:59P
4
16727
Paramasivan, Vasudha

INDONESIAN - Introductory

MALAYI 1A
EVAN35 DWIN134
MW 10-11:59A & F 10-10:59A
5
18371
Lunde, Ninik

Indonesian1A introduces students to elementary Indonesian conversation and develops reading and writing commensurate with the students abilities. This class provides  students with the skills to express words and phrases such as greeting people, leave taking, talking about oneself or family, indicating time, asking and giving directions, asking about basic everyday activities, describing various objects, expresing emotions, etc. This level provides students the skills needed to use a limited range of Indonesian language, adequate for basic communication. A one hour language lab weekly is encouraged.

INDONESIAN - Intermediate

MALAYI 100A
DWIN104
MW 12-1:59P & F 12-12:59P
5
18251
Lunde, Ninik

 

Indonesian 1A and 1B are prerequisite for Indonesian 100A, or with the approval of the instrustor.
This course provides readings in Indonesian text books, newspapers, journals, and literature. This class provides students with the skills needed to use Indonesian adequately in familiar situations and to communicate general messages. Students will be expected to be more skilled to speak Indonesian with sufficient structural accuracy and vocabulary to participate in most formal and informal conversations on practical, social, and professional topics. A one hour language lab weekly is encouraged.

 

INDONESIAN - Intermediate

MALAYI 100A
DWIN134
TTh 10-11:59A & F 11-11:59A
5
18252
Lunde, Ninik

 

Indonesian 1A and 1B are prerequisite for Indonesian 100A, or with the approval of the instrustor.
This course provides readings in Indonesian text books, newspapers, journals, and literature. This class provides students with the skills needed to use Indonesian adequately in familiar situations and to communicate general messages. Students will be expected to be more skilled to speak Indonesian with sufficient structural accuracy and vocabulary to participate in most formal and informal conversations on practical, social, and professional topics. A one hour language lab weekly is encouraged.

 

KHMER - Introductory

KHMER 1A
DWIN33
MTWThF 2-2:59P
5
17728
Smith, Frank

This class will provide students with basic speaking, listening, reading and writing proficiency in modern standard Khmer, the major language spoken in Cambodia.  The emphasis will be 60% speaking/listening and 40% reading/writing.  Students will achieve a "survival level" of conversation and ability to use the writing system, using topics such as pleasantries and introductions, family and friends, the classroom, and food.  No previous knowledge of Khmer is necessary

KHMER - Intermediate

KHMER 100A
DWIN33
MTWTh 4-5:30P
5
17717
Smith, Frank

 

This class is intended for students who have already attained a "survival level" of spoken competence in Khmer language.  No previous knowledge of the writing system is necessary.  Students will learn the basics of Khmer reading and writing, and how to express themselves more subtly, coherently, and formally in the spoken language.  Students will also be given a basic foundation in several areas of cultural and linguistic knowledge shared by all adults in Cambodia: proper classroom language, Therevada Buddhism, and public information (such as news and advertising media). 

 

KHMER - Advanced

KHMER 101A
DWIN33
MW 9-10:15A
3
33338
Smith, Frank

 

This course is intended for students who are already competent in the Khmer writing system (students should already be able to write short narratives about themselves and topics of interest, and be able to read folk tales, short stories and news articles).  Students should be conversant in a variety of topics known by Cambodian adults: religion, public informational media, politics and history, popular literature.  In this course, students will deepen their conversational and reading knowledge of all of these topics, and read (and discuss) progressively more difficult texts. 

 

INDONESIAN - Various aspects of Malay language

MALAYI 210A
EVANS61
W 3-5:59P
4
18372
Tiwon, Sylvia

PUNJABI - Introductory

PUNJABI 1A
DWIN189
TTh 9:30-10:59A
5
22922
Ubhi, Upkar

Gurmukhi script. Survey of grammar. Graded exercises, leading to a mastery of basic language patterns, essential vocabulary, and achievement of basic reading and writing skills.

PUNJABI - Intermediate

PUNJABI 100A
DWIN104
TTh 12:30-1:59P
5
23093
Ubhi, Upkar

Focus on reading, writing and speaking Punjabi more fluently in formal and informal contexts. Selected readings vary every semester. These form the starting point to stimulate students' own writings which include a long interview with a Punjabi elder from the wider community. These may be recorded in the students' own voices and form a contribution to the ongoing "Punjabi Voices" project. Review of grammar provided as needed in addition to the introduction of more complex grammatical structures. Grading based on performance in class and final presentation, weekly quizzes, two midterms, and a final.

SANSKRIT - Elementary

SANSKR 100A
DWIN104
MWF 8-9:59A
5
22940
Goldman, Sally

The focus of Sanskrit 100AB is to introduce students to Sanskrit grammar, with a goal of developing the skills necessary to read basic, simple Sanskrit texts. Sanskrit 101A covers lessons 1–12 of the Devavāṇīpraveśikā [Robert P. Goldman and Sally J. Sutherland Goldman, 2004], including, the script, sandhi, the present system [vartamāne prayoga], the karmaṇi and bhāve prayoga-s, the laṭ, laṅ, and the loṭ, and bhūte kṛdanta-s, and past active participles, nominal stems in –a/ā, i/ī, u/ū, an, aḥ, iḥ, uḥ, ant, [t]ṛ, and in [for all genders]. Also covered are participles, relative and correlative constructions, questions, and a number of idioms, as well as tatpuruṣa [including nañ, prādi and gati, and upapada samāsas] and karmadhāraya samāsas. Students are expected to memorize for recitation one or more verses per week. Emphasis is placed on correct prosody and pronunciation. The class meets for six hours each week. The first twenty minutes of each class are spent in oral drills and recitation, replacing the traditional language lab., Tthe next hour is spent in intense grammatical instruction and practice, the final thirty minutes of class are practice in reading and writing in Sanskrit. There is daily homework and memorization. Attendance is required. There are two quizzes, two mid-term exams, and a final exam. No prior knowledge of Sanskrit is required.

SANSKRIT - Intermediate

SANSKR 101A
DWIN89
MF 12-1:59P
5
33075
Goldman, Sally

SANSKRIT - Graduate Sanskrit Literature

SANSKR 200A
DWIN346B
MF 2-3:29P
4
22952
Goldman, Robert

TAMIL - Introductory

TAMIL 1A
DWIN262 DWIN134
TTh 11-12:29P & W 10-11:59A
5
23878
Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy

This introductory level course focuses on progressive acquisition of language skills to communicate effectively in both written and spoken Tamil. It facilitates development of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing competence along with basic grammar.

TAMIL - Readings in Tamil

TAMIL 101A
DWIN104
TTh 2-3:29P
4
24135
Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy

Excerpts from contemporary short stories, novels, prose and other forms of Tamil literature authored by popular Tamil writers will be used as reading material. Films will be used as supplementary material for discussions.

TAMIL - Graduate Seminar in Tamil Literature

TAMIL 210A
BARR115
Th 2-5P
4
24081
Clare, Jennifer

This course will introduce students to the history of poetic figuration (aṇi, alaṅkāram) in Tamil, both in its long and diverse theoretical tradition and in literary practice. Students will become familiar with key concepts in Tamil alaṅkāra theory and the relationship between these concepts and their Sanskrit counterparts. Class time will be divided between close reading of Tamil materials and discussion of these materials along with English-language secondary sources; students with limited Tamil reading knowledge who are interested in gaining a comparative perspective on Indian aesthetics are welcome to participate in the class with instructor approval.

TELUGU - Elementary

TELUGU 1A
DWIN175 BARR78
TTh 12:30-1:59P & W 12-12:59P
4
24248
Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy

This elementary level course focuses on progressive acquisition of language skills to communicate effectively in Telugu. It facilitates development of Listening, Speaking, Reading and Writing competence along with basic grammar.

THAI - Introductory

THAI 1A
DWIN106 DWIN134
MF 5-6:29P & W 4-5:59P
5
24245
Chowchuvech, Supatra

THAI - Intermediate

THAI 100A
DWIN104 BARR78
MF 2-3:59P & W 2-2:59P
2
23997
Chowchuvech, Supatra

THAI - Advanced

THAI 101A
DWIN33
TTh 9-10:59A
3
24239
Chowchuvech, Supatra

URDU - Introductory

HINURD 2A
DWIN189
MTWThF 11-11:59A
5
16556
THE STAFF

URDU - Intermediate

HINURD 103A
DWIN134
MWF 2-2:59P
4
16369
THE STAFF

VIETNAMESE - Introductory

VIETNMS 1A
DWIN106
MTWThF 11-11:59A
5
23909
Tran, Hanh

VIETNAMESE - Introductory

VIETNMS 1A
EVAN39
MTWThF 12-12:59P
5
23910
Tran, Hanh

VIETNAMESE - Intermediate

VIETNMS 100A
EVAN51
MTWThF 1-1:59P
5
24831
Tran, Hanh

VIETNAMESE - Advanced

VIETNMS 101A
DWIN211
TTh 2-3:29P
3
23658
Nguyen, Cam
Dept/Crs Sec Titlesort icon Instructor Days/Times Location CCN
SEASIAN 130 1 Articulations of the Female in Indonesia Tiwon, Sylvia TTh 3:30-4:59P DWIN187 31577
BANGLA 101A 1 BENGALI - Intermediate Basu, Amitabha MW 12-1:59P & F 12-12:59P DWIN175 31583
BURMESE 1A 1 BURMESE - Introductory Wong, Kenneth WTh 4-5:59P & F 4-4:59P DWIN104 32929
FILIPN W101A 1 FILIPINO - Advanced Online Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi TTh 9:30-10:59A & F 8-9:59A ONLINE 15514
FILIPN 100A 1 FILIPINO - Intermediate Llagas, Karen TTh 12:30-1:59P & F 12-1:59P DWIN79 DWIN243 15655
FILIPN 100A 2 FILIPINO - Intermediate Llagas, Karen TTh 2-3:29P & F 2-3:59P DWIN106 DWIN235 15656
FILIPN 1A 1 FILIPINO - Introductory Aban, Cynthia MTWThF 11-11:59A BARR80 15719
FILIPN 1A 2 FILIPINO - Introductory Aban, Cynthia MTWThF 12-12:59P DWIN206 15723
FILIPN 1A 3 FILIPINO - Introductory Aban, Cynthia MTWThF 1-1:59P DWIN106 15724
FILIPN W1X 1 FILIPINO - Introductory Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi MW 4-5:59P & F 3-3:59P DWIN251 ONLINE 34275
SSEASN 24 1 FRESHMAN SEMINAR Edwards, Penelope M 4-4:59P DWIN211 31754
SSEASN 250 2 GRADUATE SEMINAR - Islam in Medieval South Asia Faruqui, Munis M 2-4:59P BARR129 32036
SSEASN 250 1 GRADUATE SEMINAR - Southeast Asia History Theory Hadler, Jeffery M 3-5:59P BARR115 23089
SSEASN 250 3 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES Edwards, Penelope Th 4-6:59P DWIN204 31753
SASIAN R5A 2 Great Books of India (South Asian Reading and Composition) Gomez, Kashi MWF 1-1:59P DWIN210 23176
SASIAN R5A 3 Great Books of India (South Asian Reading and Composition) Anderson, Kris MWF 2-2:59P HPAV141 23177
SASIAN R5A 1 Great Books of India: The art of the book in South Asia (South Asian Reading and Composition) Whittington, Rebecca MWF 12-12:59P DWIN210 23175
HINURD 101A 1 HINDI - Advanced, Readings in Modern Hindi Jain, Usha MWF 12-12:59P DWIN370 16490
HINURD 221 1 HINDI - Graduate Hindi Literature Paramasivan, Vasudha Tu 2-4:59P DWIN358A 16727
HINURD 100A 1 HINDI - Intermediate Sirasao, Pranjali MWF 10-10:59P DWIN130 16390
HINURD 1A 1 HINDI - Introductory Sirasao, Pranjali MTWThF 11-11:59A BARR50 16709
HINURD 1A 2 HINDI - Introductory Sirasao, Pranjali MTWThF 12-12:59P DWIN106 16710
SASIAN 140 1 Hindu Mythology Goldman, Robert MWF 11-11:59A VLSB2060 31585
SASIAN C215 1 Indian Buddhist Textsq von Rospatt, Alexander W 3-5:59P DWIN288 23031
MALAYI 100A 1 INDONESIAN - Intermediate Lunde, Ninik MW 12-1:59P & F 12-12:59P DWIN104 18251
MALAYI 100A INDONESIAN - Intermediate Lunde, Ninik TTh 10-11:59A & F 11-11:59A DWIN134 18252
MALAYI 1A 1 INDONESIAN - Introductory Lunde, Ninik MW 10-11:59A & F 10-10:59A EVAN35 DWIN134 18371
MALAYI 210A 1 INDONESIAN - Various aspects of Malay language Tiwon, Sylvia W 3-5:59P EVANS61 18372
SSEASN C52 1 Introduction to Buddhism THE STAFF TBA 31773
SASIAN 1A 1 Introduction to the Civilization of Early India von Rospatt, Alexander MWF 1-1:59P BARR20 23064
SEASIAN 10A 1 Introduction to the Civilization of Southeast Asia Edwards, Penelope TTh 2-3:29P BARR59 23593
SEASIAN 137 1 Islam and Society in Southeast Asia Hadler, Jeffery TTh 12:30-1:59P DWIN209 31587
KHMER 101A 1 KHMER - Advanced Smith, Frank MW 9-10:15A DWIN33 33338
KHMER 100A 1 KHMER - Intermediate Smith, Frank MTWTh 4-5:30P DWIN33 17717
KHMER 1A 1 KHMER - Introductory Smith, Frank MTWThF 2-2:59P DWIN33 17728
SSEASN 375 1 METHODS AND PROBLEMS IN TEACHING SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES Faruqui, Munis W 3-5:59P BARR102 34293
SSEASN 120 Philippine Myths, Legends, Poetry and Epics Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi TTh 11-12:29P DWIN215 22955
PUNJABI 100A 1 PUNJABI - Intermediate Ubhi, Upkar TTh 12:30-1:59P DWIN104 23093
PUNJABI 1A 1 PUNJABI - Introductory Ubhi, Upkar TTh 9:30-10:59A DWIN189 22922
SASIAN 128 1 Religion in Modern India Paramasivan, Vasudha TTh 12:30-1:59P VLSB2011 31590
SANSKR 100A 1 SANSKRIT - Elementary Goldman, Sally MWF 8-9:59A DWIN104 22940
SANSKR 200A 1 SANSKRIT - Graduate Sanskrit Literature Goldman, Robert MF 2-3:29P DWIN346B 22952
SANSKR 101A 1 SANSKRIT - Intermediate Goldman, Sally MF 12-1:59P DWIN89 33075
SSEASN R5A 1 Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition) Scalice, Joseph MWF 11-11:59A DWIN211 22980
SSEASN R5A 2 Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition) Collins, Rebecca MWF 12-12:59P DWIN235 24366
SSEASN R5A 3 Self, Representation, and Nation (Southeast Asian Reading and Composition) Hewitt, Megan MWF 1-1:59P HPAV141 24367
SSEASN 84 1 SOPHOMORE SEMINAR - Southeast Asian Film
Barrios-LeBlanc, Maria Joi
Tran, Hanh
F 4-5:59 DWIN262 24470
TAMIL 210A 1 TAMIL - Graduate Seminar in Tamil Literature Clare, Jennifer Th 2-5P BARR115 24081
TAMIL 1A 1 TAMIL - Introductory Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy TTh 11-12:29P & W 10-11:59A DWIN262 DWIN134 23878
TAMIL 101A 1 TAMIL - Readings in Tamil Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy TTh 2-3:29P DWIN104 24135
TELUGU 1A 1 TELUGU - Elementary Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy TTh 12:30-1:59P & W 12-12:59P DWIN175 BARR78 24248
THAI 101A 1 THAI - Advanced Chowchuvech, Supatra TTh 9-10:59A DWIN33 24239
THAI 100A 1 THAI - Intermediate Chowchuvech, Supatra MF 2-3:59P & W 2-2:59P DWIN104 BARR78 23997
THAI 1A 1 THAI - Introductory Chowchuvech, Supatra MF 5-6:29P & W 4-5:59P DWIN106 DWIN134 24245
SASIAN C114 1 Tibetan Buddhism Ronis, Jann TTh 11-12:29P BARR587 31780
SASIAN C224 1 Tibetan Buddhist Texts Dalton, Jacob Th 2-4:59P DWIN288 23018
SSEASN 120 1 TOPICS IN SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES The Staff TTh 12:30-1:59P DWIN109 22957
HINURD 103A 1 URDU - Intermediate THE STAFF MWF 2-2:59P DWIN134 16369
HINURD 2A 1 URDU - Introductory THE STAFF MTWThF 11-11:59A DWIN189 16556
VIETNMS 101A 1 VIETNAMESE - Advanced Nguyen, Cam TTh 2-3:29P DWIN211 23658
VIETNMS 100A 1 VIETNAMESE - Intermediate Tran, Hanh MTWThF 1-1:59P EVAN51 24831
VIETNMS 1A 1 VIETNAMESE - Introductory Tran, Hanh MTWThF 11-11:59A DWIN106 23909
VIETNMS 1A 1 VIETNAMESE - Introductory Tran, Hanh MTWThF 12-12:59P EVAN39 23910