Courses

Summer 2017

Begins on: 
May 22, 2017

READING AND COMPOSITION - Great Books of India

Canceled
SASIAN R5A
DWIN247
Session A MTWThF 12-1:59P
4
13118
Paul, Abhijeet

Dharma in literature and performance 

Dharma is a key theme in Indian literature and performance, including the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. In this course, we will explore three moments of dharma in action or crisis. We will begin with the moment in “Aranyakanda” (“Forest episode”) in the Ramayana, when Ravana abducts Sita to Lanka. The next instance is the Bhagwadgita, in which Krishna delivers an eloquent commentary on dharma. In a more modern context, in Satyajit Ray’s much celebrated film Devi (Goddess, 1960), a feudal patriarch fantasizes dharma, when his daughter-in-law appears to him in a feverish dream as the goddess Kali. Dharma, in these three instances, profoundly affects the texts of gender, kinship, power, and desire.

We will read translations, commentaries, and critical writings on the Ramayana, the Bhagwadgita, and other texts by Robert P. Goldman, Wendy Doniger, Bimalkrishna Matilal, Mandakranta Bose, Krishnachandra Bhattacharya, Ashish Avikunthak, Satyajit Ray, and others.

READING AND COMPOSITION - India in the Writer's Eye

SASIAN R5B
DWIN247
Session D MTWThF 12-1:59P
4
13120
Paul, Abhijeet

This course explores eastern and western representations of India and other South Asian cultures in great works of modern literature and film. The course satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

 

Hindu Mythology

SASIAN 140
LATI122
Session D MTW 2-3:59P & Th 2-2:59P
4
13122
Gonzalez- Reimann, Luis

In this course we will study literary and religious aspects of Hindu myths. Through the reading of primary sources in translation, the course covers the main divinities and many mythological themes of early Vedic as well as later Puranic literature. We will follow the development of mythology from the Rg Veda to the epics—The Mahabharata and the Ramayana—and up to the classical mythology of the Sanskrit Puranas.

Philippine Myths and Legends

SSEASN 120
DWIN179
Session D MWF 4-5:59P
4
13123
Llagas, Karen

How do you explain the creation of the world?  Do you quote scientific explanations, or tell a story anchored on your religious beliefs, or do you have your own version? This course looks into the way pre-colonial Filipinos “explained” their “world” (mountains, rivers, seas, rain and storms, plants and animals), narrated their stories,  and expressed their beliefs, feelings, and values.

We will be reading Philippine myths, legends, poetry and epics.  This includes traditional narrative forms such as the alamat (legends) and the kuwentong-bayan (folktales) and poetic forms such as the  ambahan, diona, and tanaga.   Among the questions the course explores are:  How can we understand the way of life and belief systems of the ethnolinguistic groups of the Philippines through their literatures? How do the dynamics between orality and literacy come into play in these Filipino literary texts? How have traditional forms been revitalized and transformed by writers  to articulate contemporary concerns such as poverty, land reform, women’s issues, and human rights?

 

Philippines: History, Literature, Performance

SSEASN 148
DWIN106
Session A MWF 10-12:29P
4
13124
Barrios-Leblanc, Joi

How do we tell history?  Who writes history?  How do we know that the telling and writing of history is accurate?

There are several ways by which we can learn about the history of a country, among them, history texbooks, archival research and official documents, oral research, literature and performance. In this class, we are going to explore questions of memory and truth. For example, how did the nine (9) women writers of the poem “Our Plea” narrate the arrival of American soldiers in their village in 1899? How can we compare this poem to the official documents of the American colonial period that we find in the historical collections of the Doe library? How can we interrogate conflicting autobiographical accounts of Martial Law (1972-1986)?  What contradictions do we find in these texts?  The course asks the students to read and rethink Philippine history through literature and performance during the indigenous or precolonial period (pre-16th century), the Spanish and American colonial periods, and contemporary times.

Philippine Cultural Politics

SSEASN 160
DWIN235
Session A MWF 1-3:29P
4
13125
Barrios-Leblanc, Joi

Can a song inspire a revolution?  Is religious practice apolitical? Why do you think some films are banned from viewing?

The course focuses on literary, visual, and performance texts that participated in political discourses in the Philippines. This includes the following:  the songs and poetry of the Philippine revolution of 1896;  paintings by Fernando Amorsolo; popular cartoons such as Kenkoy and Ponyang Halubaybay; symbolic dramas of the anti-colonial movement during the first decade of American colonial rule;  songs of the peasant movement; verbal jousts on labor and capitalism;  street theater during the First Quarter Storm (late 1960s and early 1970s) and Martial Law;  visual art (paintings, street murals, cartoons) by the group Artista ng Bayan (People’s Artists);  literature  propelled by the women's movement and LGBT issues; and banned political films.   Among the questions the course addresses are the following:  How did social movements influence these texts, and in turn, how did these literary, visual and performing texts contribute to these social movements?  What strategies did the writers and artists employ in their works?  How did writers and artists face issues of censorship and persecution?  How were these works informed by popular culture, and consequently how did they interrogate popular cultural forms?

 

Intermediate Filipino

Canceled
FILIPN 100A
DWIN134
Session A MTWThF 1-3:29P
5
11599
Aban, Chat

Prerequisites:  Filipino 1AB or Filipino XY WBL or consent of instructor

Breadth Requirements:  Fulfills International Studies breadth requirements

OVERVIEW: 

This is the first part of the intermediate class series (Filipino 100 A and B) with emphasis on four basic skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The course uses the functional-situational approach in learning a language. 

The first part of the course involves a review of vocabulary and grammar points learned in Beginning Filipino through dialogues, listening, reading and writing exercises (Lessons 1-10 taken in Filipino 100A). Then, students learn four necessary skills in the effective use of Filipino:   paglalarawan (describing a person, place, or feelings);  pagsasalaysay (narrating a story or an incident); paglalahad (defining and explaining);and pangangatwiran (reasoning). The vocabulary of the student is expanded through sample dialogues and authentic texts.

 

Intermediate Filipino

Canceled
FILIPN 100B
DWIN87
Session D MTWThF 1-3:29P
5
11600
Aban, Chat

Prerequisites: Filipino 100 A or consent of instructor

Breadth Requirements:  Fulfills International Studies breadth requirements

OVERVIEW: 

This is the second part of the intermediate class series (Filipino 100 A and B) with emphasis on four basic skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The course uses the functional-situational approach in learning a language. 

Students learn four necessary skills in the effective use of Filipino:   paglalarawan (describing a person, place, or feelings);  pagsasalaysay (narrating a story or an incident); paglalahad (defining and explaining);and pangangatwiran (reasoning). The vocabulary of the student is expanded through sample dialogues and authentic texts.

 

The Yoga Tradition in Theory and Practice

SSEASN 120
BARR587
Session D MTWTh 12-1:59P
4.0
15789
Tompkins, Christopher

This exciting course will introduce students to the 2,500 year history of Yoga practice in India, where the term ‘Yoga’ has been used to refer to a variety of psych-physical spiritual practices such as breath control, meditation, visualization, mantra engagement, bodily postures, and more.  We will examine these practices in their philosophical and cultural contexts. This will be the first Yoga-based course to reveal the development of modern ‘Hatha Yoga’ from its roots in the medieval Tantric traditions.

Dept/Crs Secsort icon Title Instructor Days/Times Location CCN
SASIAN R5A 1 READING AND COMPOSITION - Great Books of India Paul, Abhijeet Session A MTWThF 12-1:59P DWIN247 13118
SASIAN R5B 1 READING AND COMPOSITION - India in the Writer's Eye Paul, Abhijeet Session D MTWThF 12-1:59P DWIN247 13120
SASIAN 140 1 Hindu Mythology Gonzalez- Reimann, Luis Session D MTW 2-3:59P & Th 2-2:59P LATI122 13122
SSEASN 120 1 Philippine Myths and Legends
Llagas, Karen
Aban, Chat
Barrios-Leblanc Joi
Session D MWF 4-5:59P DWIN179 13123
SSEASN 148 1 Philippines: History, Literature, Performance Barrios-Leblanc, Joi Session A MWF 10-12:29P DWIN106 13124
SSEASN 160 1 Philippine Cultural Politics Barrios-Leblanc, Joi Session A MWF 1-3:29P DWIN235 13125
FILIPN 100A 1 Intermediate Filipino Aban, Chat Session A MTWThF 1-3:29P DWIN134 11599
FILIPN 100B 1 Intermediate Filipino Aban, Chat Session D MTWThF 1-3:29P DWIN87 11600
SSEASN 120 002 The Yoga Tradition in Theory and Practice Tompkins, Christopher Session D MTWTh 12-1:59P BARR587 15789