Courses

Spring 2020

Begins on: 
January 14, 2020

Introduction to Bengali

BANGLA 1B
DWIN210
MW 12-2pm, F 12-1pm
5
31070
Staff

Students will be expected to acquire knowledge of the basic grammar of Bengali, such that they learn to read simple graded texts and to speak at the "low intermediate" level by the end of the year.

Introduction to Burmese

BURMESE 1B
BLC
WTh 4-6pm, F 4-5pm
5
31071
Wong, Kenneth

This introductory course in modern Burmese is a sequel to Burmese 1A, and aims to build upon the core competencies in the Burmese spoken language and writing system acquired in 1A. The course is designed to further develop student proficiency in reading and writing Burmese script, and in holding conversation. Instruction will include foundational vocabulary, grammar, spoken and aural comprehension, and basic proficiency in written expression.

Introduction to Filipino

FILIPN 1B
DWIN130
MTWThF 11-12pm
5
19750
Aban, Cynthia Agnes C

A systematic introduction to the grammar, sentence patterns, and essential vocabulary of modern standard Filipino. Emphasis is placed on extensive practice in idiomatic Filipino conversation, with additional practice in reading and writing Filipino.

Introduction to Filipino

FILIPN 1B
DWIN106
MTWThF 12-1pm
5
19751
Aban, Cynthia Agnes C

A systematic introduction to the grammar, sentence patterns, and essential vocabulary of modern standard Filipino. Emphasis is placed on extensive practice in idiomatic Filipino conversation, with additional practice in reading and writing Filipino.

Introduction to Filipino

FILIPN 1B
DWIN106
MTWThF 1-2pm
5
24210
Aban, Cynthia Agnes C

A systematic introduction to the grammar, sentence patterns, and essential vocabulary of modern standard Filipino. Emphasis is placed on extensive practice in idiomatic Filipino conversation, with additional practice in reading and writing Filipino.

Introduction to Filipino Online

FILIPN W1Y
MW 4-5:30pm, F 2-4 pm or 4-6 pm
5
19752
Barrios-Leblanc, Maria

Five hours of lecture per week online in synchronous time. Prerequisites: None.

Do you know the words nanay (mother), tatay (father), sinigang (sour soup), masarap (delicious), and kawawa (poor you)? Would you like to better communicate with your grandparents who speak Filipino and only have a limited knowledge of English? You may be a heritage learner, or a person who has a proficiency in or a cultural connection to the language he/she is studying. Filipino 1X WBL is an elementary Filipino class designed for heritage learners. It is the first course in the elementary Filipino for Heritage Learners sequence (Filipino 1X and Filipino 1Y). This course builds on the students’ passive vocabulary to harness four basic skills:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The functional-situational approach in learning a language is used in this class. 

Intermediate Filipino

FILIPN 100B
F DWIN205, TTh VLSB2030
F 12-2pm, TTh 12:30-2 pm
5
19753
Llagas, Karen

The goal of this course is to enable students to increase their proficiency in Filipino to at least the intermediate-high level of the national ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines. While speaking and listening comprehension will be stressed, training in reading and writing Filipino will be an integral part of instruction. Films and video/audio materials will supplement written texts.

Intermediate Filipino Online

FILIPN W100B
MW 4-5:30pm, F 4-6pm
5
19754
Llagas, Karen

Second half of the intermediate class series with emphasis on four skills in the effective use of Filipino: describing people, places, and feelings; narrating a story or incident; defining and explaining; and reasoning. Vocabulary is expanded through dialogues and authentic texts. At the end of the class, students should have a firm grasp of grammatical structures, write short texts, and converse with fluency. Combines real-time meetings using Adobe Connect and online learning.

Advanced Filipino

FILIPN 101B
KROE115
TTh 11-12:30pm
3
22926
Barrios-Leblanc, Maria

Students read and discuss essays on language, literature, and Phillippine society, and literary texts. Topics include language and the nation; poetry and discourse; language and ideology; and "pananalinghaga" (tropes/metaphors) in understanding society. The students choose whether they would like to go on a creative (poetry, fiction) or a research track (essay).

Introductory Hindi

HIN-URD 1B
DWIN B37
MTWThF 9-10 am
5
23667
Melnikova, Nora

Hindi writing systems. Survey of grammar. Graded exercises and readings drawn from Hindi literature, leading to mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary and achievement of basic reading and writing competence.

Introductory Indonesian

INDONES 1B
MW BARR151, F DWIN229
MW 10-12pm, F 10-11am
5
23670
Lunde, Ninik K

Survey of grammar, graded exercises, and readings drawn from Indonesian texts, leading to a mastery of basic language patterns, essential vocabulary, and to achievement of basic reading, writing, and conversational competence. Emphasis on developing communicative skills.

Intermediate Indonesian

INDONES 100B
MW DWIN205, F DWIN247
MW 12-2pm, F 12-1pm
5
23671
Lunde, Ninik K

Readings in Indonesian texts, including newspapers, journals, and literature exploring a variety of styles. Systematic study of grammatical and lexical problems arising from these readings. Advanced exercises in composition, oral and written communicative skills, and cultural competence.

Seminar in Malay Letters and Oral Tradition

INDONES 210B
DWIN225
W 3-6pm
4
32330
Tiwon, Sylvia C

Language instruction is generally conducted on the notion of legibility and a semblance of transparency.  Yet, ambiguity, concealment, imitative malfunction, and even outright dissemblance are all ingredients involved in the discursive act and contribute to the richness of a language.  Irony, parody and humor often present some of the greatest obstacles to comprehension:  is there a "grammar" of irony (or parody, sarcasm, even humor) that would help us overcome this obstacle?

This semester focuses on reading Indonesian texts.  We will develop a set of methods and tools to help us read, analyze and interpret a variety of texts in Indonesian and/or Malay.  We will approach the text as a link between author and audience against the broader social, cultural and political environment.  

Readings: we will begin with a selection of essays in contemporary Indonesian including material from journals like Tempo, and the newsmedia (print, online).  We will look at how arguments are formed, what assumptions are made, and discuss local techniques of persuasion and what happens when persuasion begins to break down.

Introductory Khmer

KHMER 1B
DWIN B34
MTWThF 2-3pm
5
20109
Smith, Francis J

Students complete their study of everyday standard Khmer to a "survival" level. While the memorization of vocabulary and common personal exchanges practiced in 1A will make up the majority of material studied, students will have some opportunity to learn to improvise and talk about personal work and research interests in Khmer. Topics include transportation and directions, the world of work, religion, health, and conducting daily life in Cambodia. Students learn to read simple authentic texts such as folk tales, personal letters, forms, and roadside signs. Students continue their study of culturally appropriate behavior in the context of Khmer culture, including notions of "saving face" and maintaining social harmony, and how these are expressed in both spoken language and in one's actions.

Intermediate Khmer

KHMER 100B
DWIN B34
MW 4-5:30pm, TTh 4-5pm
5
20110
Smith, Francis J

Students learn to read roadside signs, scholarly articles, and an entire Khmer novel. Topics include current events in Cambodia, Cambodian history and politics, and a basic overview of traditional Khmer literature. Much of this study will be accomplished by working on projects in groups with other students. One such project will involve the preparation and performance of a play based on sections of the modern Khmer novel students read in this course. All students will design and carry out an independent research project on the topic of their choice (which will account for 30% of the final grade), and present their research at the end of the second semester to an audience of their peers, entirely in Khmer.

Introductory Punjabi

PUNJABI 1B
TTh DWIN262, F EVAN41
Lec TTh 9:30-11am, Lab F 10-12pm
5
21619 (LEC), 22118 (LAB)
Ubhi, Upkar Kaur

Gurmukhi script. Survey of grammar. Graded exercises, leading to a mastery of basic language patterns, essential vocabulary, and achievement of basic reading and writing skills.

Intermediate Punjabi

PUNJABI 100B
TTh DWIN 233, F DWIN210
TTh 11-12:30pm, F 10-12pm
5
21620 (LEC), 22119 (LAB)
Ubhi, Upkar Kaur

Focus on reading, writing and speaking Punjabi more fluently in formal and informal contexts. Selected readings vary every semester. These form the starting point to stimulate students' own writings which include a long interview with a Punjabi elder from the wider community. These may be recorded in the students' own voices and form a contribution to the ongoing "Punjabi Voices" project. Review of grammar provided as needed in addition to the introduction of more complex grammatical structures. Grading based on performance in class and final presentation, weekly quizzes, two midterms, and a final.

Elementary Sanskrit

SANSKR 100B
DWIN189
MWF 8-10am
5
21659
Goldman, Sally J

Elements of Sanskrit grammar and practice in reading Sanskrit texts.

Intermediate Sanskrit

SANSKR 101B
DWIN225
MF 12-2pm
5
31080
Goldman, Sally J

Introduces students to the itihasa/puraic traditions and related commentarial style of Sanskrit. An extended passage from Valmiki's Ramayaada, Vyasa's Mahabharata, or one of the Mahapuradas is normally read with commentary, if available. The development of strong reading skills is the focus of the class. Additionally, students are introduced to the use of hard copy and web-based resources. Grammar is reviewed and explained as needed. Students are also introduced to the current scholarship on epic literature. Students are expected to memorize at least one verse per class for recitation. Emphasis is placed on correct prosody and pronunciation. Submission of an annotated translation project, assigned in class, is required.

Sanskrit Literature

SANSKR 200B
DWIN346B
MF 2-3:30
4
21660
Goldman, Robert

Advanced readings in Sanskrit literature, including Sanskrit ornate poetry with emphasis on the canons of poetic analysis of the Indian aesthetic tradition.

Introduction to the Civilization of Medieval and Modern India

SASIAN 1B
BARR60
TTh 12:30-2 pm
4
21652
Faruqui, Munis D

This course offers a broad historical and cultural survey of the civilizations of the Indian subcontinent from the 12th century to partition of India in 1947. Attention will be paid to the geography and ethnography of the region, its political history, and the religious, philosophical, literary, and artistic movements that have shaped it and contributed to its development as a unique place. 

Discussions (taught by Nicole Ferreira)

101- Th 5-6 pm in DWIN83

102- Th 4-5 pm in DWIN255

Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye

SASIAN R5B
DWIN105
MWF 1-2pm
4
21655
Qashua, Omar

Reading and composition in connection with eastern and western representations of India, and other Asian cultures, in great works of modern literature. Satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye

SASIAN R5B
DWIN105
TTh 12:30-2pm
4
21656
Pillai, Sohini

 

Course Title: Reimagining the Ramayana in Modern South Asia


Description: The story of the exiled prince Rama and his journey to rescue his beloved wife Sita from the clutches of the formidable king Ravana has delighted audiences for over two thousand years. This narrative of Rama’s life is often referred to as the “Ramayana,” in reference to the name of the ancient Sanskrit epic composed by Valmiki. While Valmiki’s text is traditionally regarded as the original Ramayana, it is by no means the only one. The story of Rama has been told countless times by different poets, artists, playwrights, novelists, television producers, and filmmakers throughout South and Southeast Asia and the Diaspora. This course focuses on Ramayana retellings that were created in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will investigate how this epic has been used by certain individuals and communities to pursue drastically different artistic, social, political, and religious goals in modern South Asia. 

Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye

SASIAN R5B
CORY285
TTh 11-12:30pm
4
21657
Ciolac, Alexandra

Course Title: The Aesthetics of Jainism

Course Description: In this course, we will be looking at important figures and moments of Jain narrative history and using artistic expressions such as paintings, illustrated manuscripts, and temple sculptures as points of entry of our exploration of literary traditions. Through investigating the "why", the "how", and the "when" behind the motivations of our artists, we will endeavor to grasp some of the central concepts of Jain religious traditions. 

Satisfies Part B of the Reading and Composition Requirement

Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye

SEASIAN R5B
DWIN246
MWF 3:30-5 pm
4
24372
Um, Janet

Reading and composition in connection with eastern and western representations of India, and other Asian cultures, in great works of modern literature. Satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye

SASIAN R5B
DWIN106
TTh 3:30-5pm
4
24373
Anderson, Kristina Lynne

Reading and composition in connection with eastern and western representations of India, and other Asian cultures, in great works of modern literature. Satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye

SASIAN R5B
DWIN255
TTh 9:30-11am
4
31081
Miller, Robert Alan

Course title: Stories Shape the World: Ethics and Identity in Indian Buddhist Narratives

 

Description: This course examines the role of storytelling in ancient India, with a focus on Buddhist narratives. In India’s rich storytelling tradition, questions of ethics, identity, gender, and sexuality are explored through animal fables, epics, and drama. Drawing on literary studies, anthropology, sociology, folklore, and psychology, we will consider how such stories shape as well as challenge cultural and religious values in the ancient and modern worlds. These discussions will then help us reflect on the ways literature becomes an instrument of resistance and subjectification in our society today. Readings will include selections from ancient Indian works such as the Pañcatantra, Jātaka Tales, and Aśvaghoṣa’s Handsome Nanda as well as modern works by authors such as Borges, Freud, Durkheim, and Foucault.

Thought in India

SASIAN C113
WHLR 120
MWF 9-10 am
4
23700
Hanner, Oren

Discussion Sections

101 - Th 12-1pm in DWIN259. CCN 24156

102 - F 11-12pm in WHLR104, CCN 24173

103 - F 12-1pm in WHLR124. CCN 31953

Modern Indian Literature

SASIAN 124
DWIN182
TTh 8-9:30am
4
32592
Kailasam, Vasugi

Lecture and discussion of 19th and 20th century Indian literature through English translations and original works in English. Interpretation of Indian society and culture through literature.

Framing Tamil Worlds: Histories, Cultures, and Identities

SASIAN 136
GPBB103
TTh 2-3:30pm
4
32631
Kailasam, Vasugi

Tamil is a Dravidian language that is spoken by approximately 77 million speakers around the world. Used as the official language in Sri Lanka and Singapore, Tamil's classical status makes it an exciting language through which diverse modes of ethnic linguistics and linguistic belonging can be studied in South Asia. This course is meant to study global Tamil societies through the interdisciplinary lenses of literary and cultural studies. Through a variety of literary, visual, cultural texts that span from the Sangam ages to the contemporary moments, this course will introduce students to the histories, growth, and formation of Tamil societies within different national contexts such as India, Sri Lanka, Singapore, Malaysia, Myanmar and diasporic spaces.

India's Great Epics

SASIAN 142
VLSB2040
MWF 11-12pm
4
23357
Goldman, Robert P

The course entails substantial selected readings from the great Sanskirt epic poems--the Mahabharata and the Ramayana in translation, selected readings from the corpus of secondary literature on Indian epic studies as well as lectures on salient issues in both. Discussion will focus on a variety of historical and theoretical approaches to the study of the poems and their extraordinary influence on Indian culture. Readings will be supplemented with selected showings of popular cinematic and television versions of the epics.

Indian Buddhist Texts

SASIAN C215
DWIN288
W 3-6pm
2-4
23058
Von Rospatt, Alex

This seminar is dedicated to reading Vinaya materials in the Sanskrit original. It also serves to introduce to the study of the Vinaya more broadly, and will include the reading of pertinent secondary literature. Our principal source will be the Vinayavastu of the Mūlasarvāstivādins, and in particular the Adhikaraṇavastu, which deals with procedural and legal matters. Time permitting, we may also turn to the śīla chapter of the Bodhisattvabhūmi and read matching passages treating the bodhisattva precepts.

Tibetan Buddhist Texts

SASIAN C224
DWIN288
T 2-5pm
2-4
23236
Dalton, Jacob

This course provides a place for graduate-level seminars in Tibetan Buddhism that rely primarily on secondary sources and Tibetan texts in translation. Content will vary between semesters but will typically focus on a particular theme. Themes will be chosen according to student interests, with an eye toward introducing students to the breadth of available western scholarship on Tibet, from classics in the field to the latest publications.

Reading and Composition- Under Western Eyes

SEASIAN R5B
DWIN 219
TTh 9-10am
4
23675
Jamkajornkeiat, Thiti

In this course, the student will read selections from the large body of scholarly texts that have been written about Southeast Asia. Expository and argumentative essays by premier scholars such as Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, Margaret Mead, Clifford Geertz, and Benedict Anderson will be examined. Discussions will cover a broad range of theoretical issues including power, gender, and space. This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement.


Introduction to the Civilization of Southeast Asia

SEASIAN 10B
DWIN219
TTh 11-12:30
4
21677
Tiwon, Sylvia C

Readings, lectures, and discussion of the culture and civilization of Southeast Asia. Insular Southeast Asia: Covers the modern-day nations of Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Special emphasis on the arts and their social and political context, with discussions on the impact of the colonial experience and the question of modernization vs. tradition.

 Discussions (taught by Megan Hewitt)

101- Th 5-6pm in KROE115

102- Th 3-4pm in VLSB2070

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar

SSEASN 39
EVAN45
T 9-11am
2
17143
Barrios-Leblanc, Maria

The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar

SSEASN 39
BARR50
F 10-12pm
2
17144
Llagas, Karen

The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Freshman/Sophomore Seminar

SSEASN 39
DWIN 211
F 2-4pm
2
17145
Barrios-Leblanc, Maria

The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Buddhism in Contemporary Society

SSEASN C145
LATI120
TTh 12:30-2pm
4
23237
Von Rospatt, Alex

Discussion Sections

101 - W 10-11am in REQGA. CCN 23238

102 - W 11-12pm in REQGA. CCN 23239

103- W 12-1pm in VLSB2038. CCN 23240

104- W 1-2pm in VLSB2070. CCN 23241

105- Th 10-11am in EVAN61. CCN 23242

106- Th 11-12pm in DWIN279. CCN 23243

Methods in South and Southeast Asian Studies

SSEASN 294
DWIN210
M 2-5pm
4
32073
Edwards, Penelope S. C.

Introduction to the principal, historical, and contemporary methods for study of the literatures, languages, religions, cultures, and peoples of South and Southeast Asia. Discussion of the disciplinary formations of Orientalism, philology, anthropology, comparative religions, gender studies, and history. Topics and readings change year to year. Seminar work will culminate in a one day student symposium.

Introductory Tamil

TAMIL 1B
EVAN72 & EVAN45
W 10-12pm & TTh 11-12:30
5
21958
Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy

The grammar of modern Tamil will be covered followed by readings in simple texts. Practice will also be given in spoken Tamil.

Elementary Telugu

TELUGU 1B
DWIN79
Lec TTh 12:30-2pm, Lab W 12-1pm
4
21959
Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy

The focus of this course will be on systematic grammar, essential vocabulary, and conversations. The goal is to achieve basic reading, writing, and conversational competence as well as exposure to Telugu culture and traditions through language learning. Students will be able to read short stories by the end of this course with some facility.

Intermediate Thai

THAI 100B
DWIN 104
MF 5-6:30 pm & W 5-7pm
5
31132
Chowchuvech, Supatra

A continuation of Intermediate Thai 100A. Students will learn to read longer and more abstract writing, advertisements from newspapers, and articles from magazines and webpage. The class will cover expressions, figures of speech, higher level grammar, and hierarchical pronouns. Writing will move from descriptive to expository. To increase verbal skills and cultural education, students will watch karaoke, TV advertisements, and films. Students will also have regular intensive conversation practice and in-class presentation. The language of instruction will be in Thai approximately 50% to 70% of the time. By the end of the semester, the average student should have acquired a level of literacy equivalent to 5th to 6th grade in Thai schools.

Advanced Thai

THAI 101B
TTh 10:50-12:15pm
3
24168
Chowchuvech, Supatra

This course is designed to enhance students' competence in reading and writing Thai. Students will be reading texts from "The Thai Cultural Reader", newspapers, news from the internet, and selected short stories. The students will improve their listening skill and will discuss selected topics both orally and in writing. The language of instruction is Thai.

 

 

 

Introductory Urdu

URDU 1B
DWIN189
MTWThF 10-11am
5
23676
Bruce, Gregory M

The course concentrates on developing skills in reading, writing, speaking, and aural comprehension. Evaluation is based on attendance, written homework assignments, quizzes, dictations, and examinations. Conventional teaching materials may be supplemented by popular songs and clips from contemporary Indian cinema.

Intermediate Urdu

URDU 100B
DWIN 104
MWF 9-10 am
4
23677
Bruce, Gregory M

Introduces various types of written and spoken Urdu; vocabulary building, idioms, and problems of syntax; and conversation. Reading of selected fiction and nonfiction in modern Urdu, including fables, short stories, and poetry. Exercises in grammar, conversation, and composition.

Introductory Vietnamese

VIETNMS 1B
DWIN235
MTWThF 12-1pm
5
22025
Tran, Hanh

An introduction to modern spoken and written Vietnamese, including intensive drill on basic phonology and grammar. By the end of the second semester the student should be able to function successfully in ordinary Vietnamese conversation and read simple texts of moderate difficulty.

Intermediate Vietnamese

VIETNMS 100B
DWIN235
MTWThF 1-2pm
5
22026
Tran, Hanh

A second-year course in Vietnamese vocabulary and syntax with intensive drills on short colloquial expressions and auditory recognition of speech patterns. First semester course stresses phraseology, sentence building, rules of composition and development of students' communicative skills. By the end of the second semester students will learn to speak and write simple compositions and will have a cursory introduction to Vietnamese literature and sample readings from contemporary Vietnamese writers.

Advanced Vietnamese

VIETNMS 101B
DWIN106
TTh 2-3:30pm
3
22027
Nguyen, Cam N

This course is designed for students who have already achieved an intermediate degree of proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing modern Vietnamese. Objective: to move students toward a greater level of fluency in each of these key areas and provide an introduction to the literature and culture of Vietnam by reading Vietnamese language texts. Readings will vary from semester to semester and will include novels, short stories, poetry, and essays from the classical, colonial, post-colonial, and contemporary periods. Topics to be addressed in class are the nature of the Sino-Vietnamese classical tradition; cultural legacies of French colonialism; the regional character of literary and cultural production; the emergence of a distinctive Vietnamese modernity, and the history of Vietnamese gender norms and relations. Regular attendance and participation in classroom activities is mandatory and no English will be spoken in class.

Intermediate Hindi

HINDI 100B
DWIN B37
TWTh 11-12pm
4
23668
Melnikova, Nora

The course acquaints students with representative readings from Hindi texts on pivotal cultural issues from a wide variety of sources, to enable them to acquire cultural competence in the language. Systematic training in advanced grammar and syntax, reinforced by exercises in composition, both oral and written. Special attention to developing communication skills. 

Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Studies: Islamicate South Asia

SSEASN 250
BARR115
W 4-7pm
1-4
33088
Faruqui, Munis D

Drawing on a broad cross-section of theoretical and methodological perspectives this graduate seminar will interrogate key historiographical debates that have shaped our understanding of the Muslim experience in S. Asia between 700 and 1750 AD. We will begin by engaging with Shahab Ahmed’s “What is Islam?”, Richard Eaton’s “India in the Persianate Age”, and Stephen Dale’s “The Muslim Empires of the Ottomans, Safavids and Mughals” before moving onto works by Finbarr Flood, Muzaffar Alam, Sanjay Subrahmanyam, Richard Eaton and Philip Wagoner, Nile Green, Supriya Gandhi, Sebastian Prange and Sunil Sharma, among others.

Philippines: History, Literature, Performance

SEASIAN 148
DWIN109
TTh 2-3:30pm
4
33150
Claudio, Leloy

Course Catalog Description:

The course focuses on Philippine history through literature and performance. Among the texts to be discussed are: traditional forms (rituals, poetry, songs, dances) that give insights to belief systems and economic, political, and social life during the indigenous or precolonial period; performance and literary forms that were instruments both of colonial conquest and anti-colonial movements; and theater and literature that participated in discourse on agrarian issues, labor, martial law and militarism, gender rights, academic freedom, and human rights. 

Class Description:

This course is a cultural history of modern Philippines, from the birth of the nation in the nineteenth century to the present. It outlines the major events in Philippine history through cultural texts that reflect the salient attitudes and ideas of key periods. Not only will this course cover canonical works, it will also examine popular texts. Expect to discuss everything from anti-colonial novels, Tagalog garage rock, third world brutalism, Manila disco, power ballads, protest songs, romantic comedies, to contemporary crime dramas.

Mainland Southeast Asian Literature

SEASIAN 129
DWIN89
MWF 12-1pm
4
33183
Collins, Rebekah Linh

Readings and lectures focus on Thailand, Vietnam and Burma; Cambodian and Laotian materials as available. After brief attention to the influence of oral tradition, classical poetry, and dance drama, emphasis will be on modern novels, short stories, film, and television in their cultural/historical context. 

Dept/Crs Sec Title Instructor Days/Times Locationsort icon CCN
BANGLA 1B 001 Introduction to Bengali Staff MW 12-2pm, F 12-1pm DWIN210 31070
BURMESE 1B 001 Introduction to Burmese Wong, Kenneth WTh 4-6pm, F 4-5pm BLC 31071
FILIPN 1B 001 Introduction to Filipino Aban, Cynthia Agnes C MTWThF 11-12pm DWIN130 19750
FILIPN 1B 002 Introduction to Filipino Aban, Cynthia Agnes C MTWThF 12-1pm DWIN106 19751
FILIPN 1B 003 Introduction to Filipino Aban, Cynthia Agnes C MTWThF 1-2pm DWIN106 24210
FILIPN W1Y 001 Introduction to Filipino Online Barrios-Leblanc, Maria MW 4-5:30pm, F 2-4 pm or 4-6 pm 19752
FILIPN 100B 001 Intermediate Filipino Llagas, Karen F 12-2pm, TTh 12:30-2 pm F DWIN205, TTh VLSB2030 19753
FILIPN W100B 001 Intermediate Filipino Online Llagas, Karen MW 4-5:30pm, F 4-6pm 19754
FILIPN 101B 001 Advanced Filipino Barrios-Leblanc, Maria TTh 11-12:30pm KROE115 22926
HIN-URD 1B 001 Introductory Hindi Melnikova, Nora MTWThF 9-10 am DWIN B37 23667
INDONES 1B 001 Introductory Indonesian Lunde, Ninik K MW 10-12pm, F 10-11am MW BARR151, F DWIN229 23670
KHMER 1B 001 Introductory Khmer Smith, Francis J MTWThF 2-3pm DWIN B34 20109
KHMER 100B 001 Intermediate Khmer Smith, Francis J MW 4-5:30pm, TTh 4-5pm DWIN B34 20110
SASIAN 124 Modern Indian Literature Kailasam, Vasugi TTh 8-9:30am DWIN182 32592
SEASIAN 10B 001 Introduction to the Civilization of Southeast Asia Tiwon, Sylvia C TTh 11-12:30 DWIN219 21677
SSEASN C145 Buddhism in Contemporary Society Von Rospatt, Alex TTh 12:30-2pm LATI120 23237
TAMIL 1B Introductory Tamil Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy W 10-12pm & TTh 11-12:30 EVAN72 & EVAN45 21958
THAI 101B Advanced Thai Chowchuvech, Supatra TTh 10:50-12:15pm 24168
VIETNMS 101B Advanced Vietnamese Nguyen, Cam N TTh 2-3:30pm DWIN106 22027
SSEASN 250 Seminar in South and Southeast Asian Studies: Islamicate South Asia Faruqui, Munis D W 4-7pm BARR115 33088
SSEASN 39 002 Freshman/Sophomore Seminar
Llagas, Karen
Tiwon, Sylvia C
F 10-12pm BARR50 17144
SASIAN 1B Introduction to the Civilization of Medieval and Modern India Faruqui, Munis D TTh 12:30-2 pm BARR60 21652
SASIAN R5B 003 Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye
Ciolac, Alexandra
Tiwon, Sylvia C
TTh 11-12:30pm CORY285 21657
THAI 100B Intermediate Thai Chowchuvech, Supatra MF 5-6:30 pm & W 5-7pm DWIN 104 31132
URDU 100B Intermediate Urdu Bruce, Gregory M MWF 9-10 am DWIN 104 23677
SSEASN 39 003 Freshman/Sophomore Seminar
Barrios-Leblanc, Maria
Tran, Hanh
F 2-4pm DWIN 211 17145
SEASIAN R5B Reading and Composition- Under Western Eyes Jamkajornkeiat, Thiti TTh 9-10am DWIN 219 23675
HINDI 100B 001 Intermediate Hindi Melnikova, Nora TWTh 11-12pm DWIN B37 23668
SASIAN R5B Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye
Qashua, Omar
Tiwon, Sylvia
MWF 1-2pm DWIN105 21655
SASIAN R5B 002 Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye
Pillai, Sohini
Tiwon, Sylvia
TTh 12:30-2pm DWIN105 21656
SASIAN R5B 005 Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye
Anderson, Kristina Lynne
Tiwon, Sylvia C
TTh 3:30-5pm DWIN106 24373
SEASIAN 148 Philippines: History, Literature, Performance Claudio, Leloy TTh 2-3:30pm DWIN109 33150
SANSKR 100B Elementary Sanskrit Goldman, Sally J MWF 8-10am DWIN189 21659
URDU 1B Introductory Urdu Bruce, Gregory M MTWThF 10-11am DWIN189 23676
SSEASN 294 001 Methods in South and Southeast Asian Studies Edwards, Penelope S. C. M 2-5pm DWIN210 32073
INDONES 210B 001 Seminar in Malay Letters and Oral Tradition Tiwon, Sylvia C W 3-6pm DWIN225 32330
SANSKR 101B Intermediate Sanskrit Goldman, Sally J MF 12-2pm DWIN225 31080
VIETNMS 1B Introductory Vietnamese Tran, Hanh MTWThF 12-1pm DWIN235 22025
VIETNMS 100B Intermediate Vietnamese Tran, Hanh MTWThF 1-2pm DWIN235 22026
SEASIAN R5B 002 Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye Um, Janet MWF 3:30-5 pm DWIN246 24372
SASIAN R5B 006 Reading and Composition- India in the Writer's Eye
Miller, Robert Alan
Tiwon, Sylvia C
TTh 9:30-11am DWIN255 31081
SASIAN C215 Indian Buddhist Texts Von Rospatt, Alex W 3-6pm DWIN288 23058
SASIAN C224 Tibetan Buddhist Texts Dalton, Jacob T 2-5pm DWIN288 23236
SANSKR 200B Sanskrit Literature Goldman, Robert MF 2-3:30 DWIN346B 21660
TELUGU 1B Elementary Telugu Sankara Rajulu, Bharathy Lec TTh 12:30-2pm, Lab W 12-1pm DWIN79 21959
SEASIAN 129 Mainland Southeast Asian Literature Collins, Rebekah Linh MWF 12-1pm DWIN89 33183
SSEASN 39 001 Freshman/Sophomore Seminar
Barrios-Leblanc, Maria
Aban, Cynthia Agnes C
Lunde, Ninik K
T 9-11am EVAN45 17143
SASIAN 136 Framing Tamil Worlds: Histories, Cultures, and Identities Kailasam, Vasugi TTh 2-3:30pm GPBB103 32631
INDONES 100B 23671 Intermediate Indonesian Lunde, Ninik K MW 12-2pm, F 12-1pm MW DWIN205, F DWIN247 23671
PUNJABI 100B Intermediate Punjabi Ubhi, Upkar Kaur TTh 11-12:30pm, F 10-12pm TTh DWIN 233, F DWIN210 21620 (LEC), 22119 (LAB)
PUNJABI 1B 001 Introductory Punjabi Ubhi, Upkar Kaur Lec TTh 9:30-11am, Lab F 10-12pm TTh DWIN262, F EVAN41 21619 (LEC), 22118 (LAB)
SASIAN 142 India's Great Epics Goldman, Robert P MWF 11-12pm VLSB2040 23357
SASIAN C113 001 Thought in India Hanner, Oren MWF 9-10 am WHLR 120 23700