Spring 2012

Begins on: 
January 10, 2012

SEMINAR S,SEASN

S,SEASN 190
122 BARROWS
TuTh 12:30-2:00P
3
83257
BARRIOS-LEBLANC, M

The course will examine the various strategies of (re-)narrating colonial/neocolonial history in three genres: literature (novels, short fiction, poetry), essays, and films from the Philippines and the United States. Notions such as imperialism, nation, narration, history, nationalism, memory, ethnicity, language, power, gender, and subject formation will be discussed.

FRESH/SOPH SEMINAR

S,SEASN 39I
B4 DWINELLE
Tu 9-11A
2-4
83214
BARRIOS-LEBLANC, M


INTRO BENGALI

BANGLA 1B
205 WHEELER
MW 12:00-2:00P, F 12:00-1:00P
5
84403
BASU, A

Students will get familiar with reading and comprehending simple Bengali text, along with speaking Bangla and expressing simple feelings in Bengali language - thus being able to communicate effectively among peers. This course is deemed to be a continuation of Bangla 1A.

INTRO TO FILIPINO

FILIPN 1B
54 BARROWS
MTuWThF 11:00-12:00P
5
84503
ABAN, C

Prerequisites: 1A or equivalent or consent of instructor

INTERMED FILIPINO

FILIPN 100B
50 BARROWS
MTuWThF 2:00-3:00P
5
84509
BARRIOS-LEBLANC, M

Prerequisites: 100A or equivalent or consent of instructor.

ADVANCED FILIPINO

FILIPN 101B
80 BARROWS
MWF 3:00-4:00P
3
84512
BARRIOS-LEBLANC, M

Prerequisites: Two years of Filipino (Tagalog) or consent of instructor.

INTRD HINDI

HIN-URD 1B
31 EVANS
MTuWThF 8:00-9:00A
5
84603
HUETTEMANN, A

Prerequisite: Introductory Hindi 1A. Students without the prerequisite will need to take a placement test in the first week of instruction.

Continuation of the 1A course in the fall term. Five hours of classroom instruction per week. Survey of grammar, graded exercises and readings, leading to mastery of grammatical structures, essential vocabulary and achievement of basic reading and writing competence. Emphasis will be on developing communicative skills in both spoken and written language within a cultural framework.

INTRD HINDI

HIN-URD 1B
31 EVANS
MTuWThF 10:00-11:00A
5
84606
HUETTEMANN, A

Prerequisite: Introductory Hindi 1A. Students without the prerequisite will need to take a placement test in the first week of instruction.

Continuation of the 1A course in the fall term. Five hours of classroom instruction per week. Survey of grammar, graded exercises and readings, leading to mastery of grammatical structures, essential vocabulary and achievement of basic reading and writing competence. Emphasis will be on developing communicative skills in both spoken and written language within a cultural framework.

INTRD URDU

HIN-URD 2B
210 DWINELLE
MTuWThF 11:00-12:00P
5
84611
JALIL, Q

The 2nd semester Urdu course is intended for students who have completed 1st semester or beginner’s level Urdu. All four skills, speaking, listening, reading and writing will be taught. Main emphasis will be on oral skills. Reading will come after oral skills but will get more emphasis than it had during the 1st semester.

INTERMEDIATE HINDI

HIN-URD 100B
204 WHEELER
MW 12:00-1:00P
4
84612
HUETTEMANN, A

Prerequisite: Intermediate Hindi 100A. Students without the prerequisite will need to take a placement test in the first week of instruction.

Continuation of the 100A course in the fall term. Three hours of classroom instruction and one hour of discussion per week This course acquaints students with representative readings from Hindi texts on pivotal cultural issues from a wide variety of sources, to enable them to acquire cultural competence in the language. Systematic training in advanced grammar and syntax, reinforced by exercises in composition, both oral and written. Special attention will be given to developing communication skills in both spoken and written language.

 

INTERMEDIATE HINDI

HIN-URD 100B
204 WHEELER
F 12:00-2:00P
-
84615
HUETTEMANN, A

Prerequisite: Intermediate Hindi 100A. Students without the prerequisite will need to take a placement test in the first week of instruction.

Continuation of the 100A course in the fall term. Three hours of classroom instruction and one hour of discussion per week This course acquaints students with representative readings from Hindi texts on pivotal cultural issues from a wide variety of sources, to enable them to acquire cultural competence in the language. Systematic training in advanced grammar and syntax, reinforced by exercises in composition, both oral and written. Special attention will be given to developing communication skills in both spoken and written language.

READINGS MODERN HIN

HIN-URD 101B
80 BARROWS
MWF 12:00-1:00P
3
84618
JAIN, U R

This course is designed for the students who have completed Hindi 101A or the equivalent.

It is a continuation of Hindi 101A, with the goals of conversational fluency and advanced reading and writing competence. Students will be exposed to a variety of contemporary literary genres. Weekly readings and class discussions will be on short stories, poems, and dramatic sketches from representative authors. In 101B students will also work on films based on well-known literary texts, such as those of Premchand. These readings and films focus on various social, cultural, political, and historical aspects of Indian society. Students are encouraged to explore these issues in their written assignments as well as in their class discussions. Written assignments on themes suggested by the readings will be required. Furthermore, students are expected to investigate a topic in depth and write a research paper in Hindi. Special attention will be given to matters of style and idiom and there will be advanced exercises in composition.

The class will be conducted entirely in Hindi and students will acquire language skills sufficient to approach literary texts on their own.

INTERMEDIATE URDU

HIN-URD 103B
129 BARROWS
MWF 2:00-3:00P
4
84621
JALIL, Q

This course is intended for the students who have already passed three semesters of Urdu [1st year and one more semester] or who an equal level of Proficiency in all four skills of Urdu. In this 4th semester level course, all four skills, speaking, listening, reading and writing will be taught. Oral skills and reading comprehension will be main focus of the course and there will be equal emphasis on these skills.

ADVANCED URDU

HIN-URD 104B
103 WHEELER
MWF 3:00-4:00P
3
84624
JALIL, Q

This course is intended for such students who have completed 5th semester of Urdu [2 years and one semester] or have equivalent level of proficiency in Urdu.

All four skills i.e. speaking, listening, reading and writing will be taught. Reading will serve as the base activity of the course while developing all language skills.

HINDI LITERATURE

HIN-URD 221
358B DWINELLE
W 3:00-6:00P
4
84627
DALMIA, V

Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Two years of Hindi or equivalent.

The course will focus on readings in modern Hindi fiction, drama and critical essays, occasionally also on the medieval devotional literature in Hindi. Topics will vary from year to year. Students will be expected to write a 20-25 page research paper.

INTRO KHMER

KHMER 1B
106 DWINELLE
MTuWThF 2:00-3:00P
5
84803
SMITH, F J

Prerequisites: 1A or equivalent.

Students complete their study of everyday standard Khmer to a "survival" level.

While the memorization of vocabulary and common personal exchanges practiced in Khmer 1A will make up the majority of material studied, students will have some opportunity to learn to improvise and talk about personal work and research interests in Khmer. Topics include transportation and directions, the world of work, religion, health, and conducting daily life in Cambodia. Students learn to read simple authentic texts such as folk tales, personal letters, forms and roadside signs. Students continue their study of culturally appropriate behavior in the context of Khmer culture, including notions of "saving face" and maintaining social harmony, and how these are expressed in both spoken language and in one's actions.

INTERMED KHMER

KHMER 100B
33 DWINELLE
MW 4:00-5:30P, TuTh 4:00-5:00P
5
84806
SMITH, F J

Prerequisite: Khmer 100A.

Students learn to read roadside signs, scholarly articles, and an entire Khmer novel.

Topics include current events in Cambodia, Cambodian history and politics, and a basic overview of traditional Khmer literature. Much of this study will be accomplished by working on projects in groups with other students. One such project will involve the preparation and performance of a play based on sections of the modern Khmer novel students read in this course. All students will design and carry out an independent research project on the topic of their choice (which will account for 30% of the final grade), and present their research at the end of the second semester to an audience of their peers, entirely in Khmer.

ADVANCED KHMER

KHMER 101B
2125 DWINELLE
TuTh 11:00-12:30P
3
84809
SMITH, F J

Students will read advanced texts dealing with the topics of politics and history. They will also gain exposure to traditional, verse texts, and read, discuss, and undertake group projects based on a variety of modern Khmer short stories. As is the case with Intermediate Khmer, students will also undertake substantial independent study, culminating in a final oral presentation. However, the standard by which both written and oral material will be judged will be much higher for Advanced students. Special attention will be paid to formal speaking style and advanced grammatical structures in Khmer for all students, and colloquial spoken expression for non-native speakers.

INTROD INDONESIAN

MALAY/I 1B
103 WHEELER
MW 10:00-12:00P, F 10:00-11:00A
5
85003
LUNDE, N K

This course is the continuation of Indonesian 1A.

Survey of grammar, graded exercises, and readings drawn from Indonesian texts, leading to a mastery of basic language patterns, essential vocabulary, and to achievement of basic reading, writing, and conversational competence. Emphasis on developing communicative skills.

Textbooks

Beginnging Indonesian Through Self Instruction, Book 2; John Wolff; Cornell University 1992; ISBN: 0877275300

INTERMED INDONESIAN

MALAY/I 100B
102 BARROWS, MW 12:00-2:00P
104 DWINELLE, F 12:00-1:00P
5
85006
LUNDE, N K

This course is the continuation of Indonesian 100A.

Readings in Indonesian texts, including newspapers, journals, and literature exploring a variety of styles. Systematic study of grammatical and lexical problems arising from these readings. Advanced exercises in composition, oral and written communicative skills, and cultural competence.

Textbooks

Beginnging Indonesian Through Self Instruction, Book 3; John Wolff; Cornell University 1992; ISBN: 0877275319

SEM MAL LET ORL TRD

MALAY/I 210B
104 DWINELLE
W 3:00-6:00P
4
85009
TIWON, S C

Various aspects of Malay language and literature, history and development of the language, classical literature, drama, oral literature, modern literature of Indonesia and Malaysia, and dialect studies. Applies various theoretical approaches to the study of the language and literature.

INTROD PUNJABI

PUNJABI 1B
78 BARROWS TuTh 2:00-3:30P,
B4 DWINELLE F 10:00-12:00P
5
85203
UBHI, U K

Gurmukhi script. Survey of grammar. Graded exercises, leading to a mastery of basic language patterns, essential vocabulary, and achievement of basic reading and writing skills.

INTERMED PUNJABI

PUNJABI 100B
123 DWINELLE TuTh 12:30-2:00P,
B4 DWINELLE F 10:00-12:00P
5
85206
UBHI, U K

Focus on reading, writing and speaking Punjabi more fluently in formal and informal contexts. Selected readings vary every semester. These form the starting point to stimulate students' own writings which include a long interview with a Punjabi elder from the wider community. These may be recorded in the students' own voices and form a contribution to the ongoing "Punjabi Voices" project. Review of grammar provided as needed in addition to the introduction of more complex grammatical structures. Grading based on performance in class and final presentation, weekly quizzes, two midterms, and a final.

CIV MED & MOD INDIA

S ASIAN 1B
88 DWINELLE
TuTh 12:30-2:00P
4
84003
FARUQUI, M D

This course offers a broad historical and cultural survey of the civilizations of the Indian subcontinent from the twelfth century to the partition of India in 1947. Attention will be paid to the geography and ethnography of the region, its political history and to the religious, philosophical, literary, and artistic movements that have shaped it and contributed to its development as a unique, diverse and fascinating world civilization.

INDIA WRITERS EYE

S ASIAN R5B
123 DWINELLE
MWF 8:00-9:00A
4
84006
MURCHIE, I

Reading and composition in connection with eastern and western representations of India, and other Asian cultures, in great works of modern literature. Satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

Textbooks

Midnight's Children; Salman Rushdie; Random House 2006; ISBN:0812976533

A Passage to India; E.M. Foster; Mariner Books 1965; ISBN:0156711427

Inheritance of Loss; Kiran Desai; Grove Press 2006; ISBN:0802142818

Namesake; Jhumpa Lahiri; Mariner Books 2004; ISBN:0618485228

INDIA WRITERS EYE

S ASIAN R5B
123 DWINELLE
MWF 9:00-10:00A
4
84009
ARCHAMBAULT, H

Reading and composition in connection with eastern and western representations of India, and other Asian cultures, in great works of modern literature. Satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

Textbooks

In an Antique Land; Amistav Ghosh; Random House 1994; ISBN: 0679727833

INDIA WRITERS EYE

S ASIAN R5B
123 DWINELLE
MWF 1:00-2:00P
4
84012
ACHARYA, S

Reading and composition in connection with eastern and western representations of India, and other Asian cultures, in great works of modern literature. Satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

Textbooks

Twilight in Delhi; Ahmed Ali; Rupa & Co. 1984; ISBN: 8129112515

A Passage to India; EM Forster; Mariner Books 1924; ISBN: 0156711427

A Princess's Pilgrimage: Nawab Sikandar Begum's A Pilgrimage to Mecca; Siobhan Lambert-Hurley; Indiana University Press 2008; ISBN: 0253220033

The Oxford India Anthology of Modern Urdu Literature: Fiction; Mehr Afshan Farooqi; Oxford University Press 2011; ISBN: 0198069162

The Siege of Krishnapur; JG Farrell; New York Review Books Classic 2004; ISBN: 159017092X

The Bride's Mirror: A tale of life in Delhi a hundred years ago; Maulvi Nazir Ahmed; Permanent Black 2001; ISBN: 8178240211

 

INDIA WRITERS EYE

S ASIAN R5B
104 DWINELLE
TuTh 8:00-9:30A
4
84015
UM, J

Reading and composition in connection with eastern and western representations of India, and other Asian cultures, in great works of modern literature. Satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

Textbooks

The Shadow Lines; Amitav Ghosh; Mariner Books 2005; ISBN: 061832996X

Midnight's Children; Salman Rushdie; Random House 2006; ISBN: 0812976533

Writing Analytically 6th edition; Rosenwasser & Stephen; Wadsworth-Cengage 2011; ISBN: 0495910082

Samskara: A Rite for a dead man; U. R. Anantha Murthy; Oxford University Press 1979; ISBN: 0195610792 

Bitter Soil; Mahasweta Devi; Seagull Books - Book Out of Print; ISBN: 8170461472

INDIA WRITERS EYE

S ASIAN R5B
263 DWINELLE
MWF 9:00-10:00A
4
84018
PAUL, A

Reading and composition in connection with eastern and western representations of India, and other Asian cultures, in great works of modern literature. Satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

Textbooks

The Armageddon Mandala; Gopal Mukerjee; Revenge Ink 2010; ISBN: 0955807808

Insects are just like you and me except some of them have wings; Kuzhali Manickavel; Blaft Publications 2008; ISBN: 8190605631

The Blaft Anthology of Tamil Pulp Fiction; Rakesh Khanna, editor; Blaft Publications 2008; ISBN: 8190605607

A Foreigner Carrying in the Crook of His Arm a Tiny Bomb; Amitava Kumar; Duke University Press 2010; ISBN: 0822345781

 

INDIA WRITERS EYE

S ASIAN R5B
175 DWINELLE
TuTh 3:30-5:00P
4
84021
LITTLE, L

Reading and composition in connection with eastern and western representations of India, and other Asian cultures, in great works of modern literature. Satisfies the second half of the reading and composition requirement.

Textbooks

Anandamath/The Sacred Brotherhood; Bankimcandra Chhatterji; Oxford Press 2005; ISBN: 0195178580

The Fatal Rumour: A Nineteenth-century Novel; B.R. Rajam Aiyar; Oxford New Delhi 1998; ISBN: 0195656393

The Guide: A Novel; R.K. Narayan and Michael Gorra; Penguin Classics 2006; ISBN: 0143039644

The Nine Unknown; Talbot Mundy; Wildside Press (Print On Demand); ISBN: 1434481360

CLASSIC IND LIT TRS

S ASIAN 121
203 WHEELER
TuTh 11:00-12:30P
4
84027
KNUTSON, J R

Love in Classical Sanskrit Literature

The course will introduce students to traditions of classical Sanskrit poetry from the ancient through early medieval periods with reference to classical South Asian traditions of literary analysis. This semester's focus is on love poetry: the ways in which experiences of love and eroticism are constructed in poetry, the way amorous relationships and encounters are defined, and the way such themes evolved over time and encoded various historical contents. The course will conclude with a comparison/contrast of some early vernacular poetry which both referenced itself to and departed from the Sanskrit tradition.

Textbooks

Gitagovinda: Love Songs of Radha and Krishna; Jayadeva, Trans. Siege; NYU Press 2009; ISBN: 0814740782

Handsome Nanda/Saundarananda; Asvaghosa, Trans. Covill; NYU Press 2007; ISBN: 0814716830

The Little Clay Cart; Shudraka, Trans. Diwakr Acharya; NYU Press; ISBN: 0814707297

Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality; Sigmund Freud; Basic Books 2011; ISBN: 0465086063

Kamasutra; Vatsyayana, Trans. Doniger and Kakar; Oxford University Press; ISBN: 0199539162

CLASSIC IND LIT TRS

S ASIAN 121
2070 VALLEY LS
Tu 4:00-5:00P
-
84030
KNUTSON, J R

TIBETAN BUDDHISM

S ASIAN C114
156 DWINELLE
TuTh 11:00-12:30P
4
84024
TBD

Cross-listed with Tibetan C114 and Buddhist Studies C114

INDIA'S GREAT EPICS

S ASIAN C142
2060 VLSB
MWF 11:00-12:00P
4
84039
GOLDMAN, R P

In depth study of the great ancient epics of India, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata and their role in the development of the religious, social, literary and political cultures of Southern Asia.

Cross-listed with Religious Studies C166

Textbooks

The Mahabharata; John D. Smith; Penguin Classics 2009; ISBN: 0140446818

INDIAN BUDDHST TEXT

S ASIAN C215B
288 DWINELLE
W 3:00-6:00P
2-4
84042
BAUMS, S

Cross-listed with Buddhist Studies C215B

RELIGN ERLY INDIA

S ASIAN C127
242 DWINELLE
TuTh 3:30-5:00P
4
84033
BAUMS, S

Religion in Early India

(South and Southeast Asian Studies C127, Religious Studies C161)

This class will explore the religious traditions of South Asia from earliest times up to the middle ages. The first half of the class will present a historical survey, covering prehistory and the Indus Valley Civilization; the Vedic period, Brahmanic culture, and the thought of the Upaniṣads; the origins and development of Buddhism, Jainism, the Ājīvikas, and other renunciant traditions; the early development of Hinduism; and the spread of South Asian religions to Southeast, Central and East Asia. In the second half of the class, we will focus on key concepts and central topics in the religions of early South Asia, including the doctrine of karma; the notion of dharma; paths to liberation and salvific figures; the institutional development of South Asian religions; the role of ritual; and the engagement of the modern world with early South Asian religion. Throughout the class, close attention will be paid to primary sources (both ancient texts in English translation and archeological data) and the evidence that they provide for religious thought and practice in early South Asia. Classtime will be spent in equal measure on lectures and in interactive discussions, including student presentations on their readings and their final research papers.

UNDER WESTERN EYES

S,SEASN R5B
210 DWINELLE
MWF 3:00-4:00P
4
83203
KEO, S

In this course, the student will read selections from the large body of scholarly texts that have been written about Southeast Asia. Expository and argumentative essays by premier scholars such as Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, Margaret Mead, Clifford Geertz, and Benedict Anderson will be examined. Discussions will cover a broad range of theoretical issues including power, gender, and space.

This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Textbooks

Dumb Luck; Zinoman; University of Michigan Press 2002; ISBN: 0472068040

Negara; Geertz; Princeton Press 1981; ISBN: 0691007780

Record of Cambodia; Daguan; University of Washington Press 2007; ISBN: 9749511247

Imagined Communities; Anderson; VERSO 2006; ISBN: 1844670864

A Manual for Writers; Turabian; University of Chicago Press 2007; ISBN: 0226823377

UNDER WESTERN EYES

S,SEASN R5B
201 WHEELER
TuTh 8:00-9:30A
4
83206
LOWMAN, I

In this course, the student will read selections from the large body of scholarly texts that have been written about Southeast Asia. Expository and argumentative essays by premier scholars such as Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, Margaret Mead, Clifford Geertz, and Benedict Anderson will be examined. Discussions will cover a broad range of theoretical issues including power, gender, and space.

This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Textbooks

The Art of Not Being Governed; James Scott; Yale University Press 2010; ISBN: 0300169175

The Spectre of Comparisons; Benedict Anderson; Verso 1998; ISBN: 1859841848

A Record of Cambodia: The Land and its People; Zhou Daguan and Peter Harris; Silkworm Books 2007; ISBN: 9749511247

The Terrible but Unfinished Story of Norodom Sihanouk, King of Cambodia; Helene Cixous; University of Nebraska Press 1994; ISBN: 0803263619

UNDER WESTERN EYES

S,SEASN R5B
204 WHEELER
TuTh 12:30-2:00P
4
83209
LOWMAN, I

In this course, the student will read selections from the large body of scholarly texts that have been written about Southeast Asia. Expository and argumentative essays by premier scholars such as Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, Margaret Mead, Clifford Geertz, and Benedict Anderson will be examined. Discussions will cover a broad range of theoretical issues including power, gender, and space.

This course satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Textbooks

The Art of Not Being Governed; James Scott; Yale University Press 2010; ISBN: 0300169175

The Spectre of Comparisons; Benedict Anderson; Verso 1998; ISBN: 1859841848

A Record of Cambodia: The Land and its People; Zhou Daguan and Peter Harris; Silkworm Books 2007; ISBN: 9749511247

The Terrible but Unfinished Story of Norodom Sihanouk, King of Cambodia; Helene Cixous; University of Nebraska Press 1994; ISBN: 0803263619

FRESH/SOPH SEMINAR

S,SEASN 39G
L45 UNIT III DIN
F 8:00-10:00A
2-4
83212
HART, K

"Think Gender" in Indian Short Stories

In this seminar, students will read fifteen short stories from various languages of India translated into English. The stories will describe the relationships between men and women and how the society looks at the roles of men and women in Indian culture. The students will be expected to read the stories and to discuss and critique them in class. They will also be expected to write two five-page research papers. This seminar may be used to satisfy the Arts and Literature or Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement in Letters and Science.

Kausalya Hart (M.A., Annamalai University, 1962) is the author of Tamil for Beginners, Tamil Madu, and Tamil Tiraippadam (advanced Tamil textbooks). She has prepared numerous Tamil language teaching aids (including a collection of Tamil movie videos), and a dictionary for modern Tamil. Her current research involves the preparation of a dictionary of Tamil inscriptions. Her interests include Tamil literature, grammar, and inscriptions.

INTRO TOPIC REL ST

S,SEASN C51
39 EVANS
Th 2-3P
-
83226
TBD

INTRO TOPIC REL ST

S,SEASN C51
9 LEWIS
TuTh 11:00-12:30P
4
83215
LITTLE, L

Cross-listed with Religious Studies C90B

Textbooks

The Life of Hinduism; Hawley and Narayanan; University of California Press 2006; ISBN: 0520249143

INTRO TOPIC REL ST

S,SEASN C51
179 DWINELLE
W 3:00-4:00P
-
83218
TBD

INTRO TOPIC REL ST

S,SEASN C51
80 BARROWS
W 4:00-5:00P
-
83221
TBD

INTRO TOPIC REL ST

S,SEASN C51
41 EVANS
Th 1:00-2:00P
-
83224
TBD

TOPICS S,SEASN

S,SEASN 120
175 DWINELLE
TuTh 2:00-3:30P
4
83248
LEWIS, S L

The City in South and Southeast Asia

This course examines the emergence of the modern city in South and Southeast Asia from a trans-national, comparative historical perspective. We begin by considering port-cities in the Indian Ocean, or ‘maritime Asia,’ as an arena of commercial and cultural exchange and the role of migrants in the making of these cities. We look at the ways in which colonial rulers sought to discipline their urban subjects through architecture, urban planning, and the policing of urban space. And we examine the growth of new public spheres and varieties of Asian sociability, as well as popular culture, street-life and Asian writing on the city.

We consider cities as dynamic nodes of intellectual exchange and as incubators of ideas, particularly in the late colonial era. We examine the ways in which cities have influenced and were influenced by the growth of nationalism, the rise of commercial elites and the middle class, and urban subcultures. We look at the effects of war and violence and the roots of urban poverty in the transition from the colonial to the post-colonial era. And we interrogate post-colonial visions of urban modernization, explore aspirations for global-city status, and investigate the role of memory and heritage in shaping city identities.

The class is taught through thematic lectures on the topics above, as well as seminars, where we will compare and contrast different case studies presented by the students. Each student will be asked to explore one city in depth, acting as our resident expert on that city throughout the course. Cities include: Lahore, Karachi, Delhi, Bombay/Mumbai, Madras/Chennai, Colombo, Calcutta/Kolkota, Dhaka, Rangoon/Yangon, Singapore, Penang, Batavia/Jakarta, Hanoi, Saigon/Ho Chi Minh City, Phnom Penh, Malacca, Kuala Lumpur, Jogjakarta, Manila and Bangkok, as well as Shanghai and Hong Kong. Building on a preliminary bibliography for their city, students will be expected to conduct research in the library and on the web, particularly for media content for use in class presentations. Course assessment is based on class participation including reader responses, in-class presentations, a city profile, a mid-term exam, and a final long research paper.

TOPICS S,SEASN

S,SEASN 120
109 WHEELER
TuTh 3:30-5:00P
4
83251
TIWON, S C

This course offers an introduction to the mythologies of insular Southeast Asia and provides a comparative overview of key myths of mainland Southeast Asia. The course will emphasize indigenous narrative traditions including myths of creation, archipelagic geographies, court and village, the cycle of the Rice Mother and spirits of nature, tricksters and transgressors. The course also explores the ways in which these traditions interact with the epic court traditions informed by the Mahabharata and Ramayana and with contemporary discourses on modernity, development and globalization.

Textbooks

Asian Mythologies; Yves Bonnefoy; University of Chicago Press 1993; ISBN: 0226064565

Shadows of Empire; Laurie Sears; Duke University Press 1996; ISBN: 0822316978

Sacred Narrative; Alan Dundes; University of California Press 1984; ISBN: 0520051920

INTERMED VIET

VIETNMS 100B
289 CORY
MTuWThF 2:00-3:00P
5
86012
TRAN, H

A second-year course in Vietnamese vocabulary and syntax with intensive drills on short colloquial expressions and auditory recognition of speech patterns. After the first semester, which stresses phraseology, sentence building, rules of composition and development of students' communicative skills, students will learn to read and write short compositions following everyday topics in the second semester. Towards the end of the second semester, more formal writings in intellectual fields such as culture and literature will also be introduced.

SEMINAR IN S,SEASN

S,SEASN 250
102 LATIMER
W 3:00-6:00P
4
83401
FARUQUI, M D

Religious Interactions in Medieval India

This graduate seminar is designed to provide a thematic approach to the study of religion in medieval India. It broadly covers the period between 700 and 1750 A.D.—a time of significant developments in both Hinduism and Islam on the subcontinent. Besides witnessing tremendous religious ferment in the South and the emergence of popular devotional movements within Hinduism in the North, the period also observed Islam's arrival in northern India and, subsequently, new mystical and regional articulations.

This seminar aims to engage with key publications that deal with two broad lines of enquiry. The first relates to the plurality of traditions within Hinduism and Islam as they evolved in the subcontinent. Instead of working with pan-Indian assumptions, it focuses on specific regions in order to trace what constitutes orthodoxy and heterodoxy for an emergent or newly introduced tradition at any given period of time. The second set of questions will bring the various religious traditions in direct conversation with each other. If—as this course is inclined to assume—there are in fact many local, regional, a well as trans-regional traditions at play, what is the nature of the interactions between them? How might time and space determine the tenor of relations between them? Does the presence of another and, at times, competing set of religious traditions enable or restrain the emergence of new understandings of either set of religious traditions?

Your final grade will depend on two criteria:

i) Class presentations (30%)

You will be expected to take responsibility for leading the discussion of one or more weeks. For your appointed week, kindly email the class a series of questions and critical issues that draw on the assigned readings by 5 pm on Thursday. Since the class is yours to lead, set an agenda that will maximize discussion.

For those of you who are part of the “audience,” please note that you will be expected to read the texts closely for argument, interpretive framework and methodology. Come prepared to ask questions and provide commentarial insights.

ii) Research paper (70%)

You will be expected to write a 20 page double-spaced final paper on a topic of your choosing. This paper is due at the end of the reading period.

SEMINAR IN S,SEASN

S,SEASN 250
1229 DWINELLE
M 3:00-6:00P
4
83398
HADLER, J A

This weekly seminar will be an investigation into the cultures and politics of Islam in Southeast Asia through readings of key texts. In particular we will trace the development of a discourse on syncretism from the late 18th century through to our “post September 11 world.” Is there a peculiarly Southeast Asian Islam? Why is Buddhism central to studies of mainland Southeast Asia while scholars of Indonesia have been able to disregard Islam? How does the Islamic “Moro” identity fit within Philippine nationalism? We will analyze theories on early conversion to Islam and explore accounts of the Arab, Indian, Chinese, and European encounters with Islam in Southeast Asia. We will analyze the role of Sufism and mystical associations, and of reformist movements in the 18th through 20th centuries that reacted to these associations. Of critical importance are the Southeast Asian Muslim discussions of local traditions (adat), the idea of the “modern,” nationalism, and the place of the Southeast Asian Muslim community within the broader Muslim world. Emphasis will be on Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. Readings will include primary sources in translation as well as works by T. Abdullah, C. Geertz, Hamka, M. Laffan, R. McVey, N. Madjid, W. Roff, N. Saleeby, C. Snouck Hurgronje, and others.

Textbooks

Sitti Nurbaya; Marah Rusli; Lontar 2011; ISBN: 9798083792

Islam and Nation; Edward Aspinall; Stanford University Press 2009; ISBN: 0804760454

The Makings of Indonesian Islan; Michael Laffan; Princeton University Press 2011; ISBN: 069114530X

Religion of Java; Clifford Geertz; University of Chicago Press 1976; ISBN: 0226285103

Mystic Synthesis in Java; M. C. Ricklefs; EastBridge 2006; ISBN: 1891936611

Pesantren Tradition; Zamakhsyari Dhofier; Arizona State Southeast Asia Studies 1999; ISBN: 188104419X

INTROD TAMIL

TAMIL 1B
3401 DWINELLE
TuTh 9:30-11:00A
5
85603
HART, K

INTROD TAMIL

TAMIL 1B
NO FACILITY
UNSCHEDULED
-
85606
HART, K

Discussion Section

READINGS IN TAMIL

TAMIL 101B
89 DWINELLE
TuTh 11:00-12:30P
4
85609
HART, K

SMR TAMIL LIT

Canceled
TAMIL 210B
350B DWINELLE
UNSCHEDULED
4
-
HART, G L

ELEM TELUGU

TELUGU 1B
185 BARROWS
WF 12:00-2:00P
4
85803
SUNKARI, H

The focus of this course will be on systematic grammar, essential vocabulary, and conversations. The goal is to achieve basic reading, writing, and conversational competence as well as exposure to Telugu culture and traditions through language learning. Students will be able to read short stories by the end of this course with some facility.

 

INTERMEDIATE THAI

THAI 100B
187 DWINELLE
TuTh 5:30-7:30P, W 6:00-7:00P
5
85903
CHOWCHUVECH, S

Intermediate Thai 100B is an upper intermediate level course, a continuation of Intermediate Thai 100A. Students entering this course should be able to read descriptive articles, write short compositions on their own, and carry on a basic level of conversation. In this class, students will read longer and more abstract writing, advertisements from newspapers, simple articles from magazines, and comics. The class will cover expressions, proverbs, figures of speech, grammar, and hierarchical pronouns. Writing will move from descriptive to expository. Students who graduate from this class would have a literacy level equivalent to a minimum of Grade 5. For listening comprehension and cultural education, students will watch karaoke, TV advertisements, and films. Students will also be required to have conversation practice with partners every other week. The language of instruction will be approximately 70% Thai.

INTRO VIETNAMESE

VIETNMS 1B
31 EVANS
MTuWThF 12:00-1:00P
5
86003
TRAN, B H

An introduction to modern spoken and written Vietnamese, including intensive drill on basic phonology and grammar. By the end of the second semester the student should be able to function successfully in ordinary Vietnamese conversation and read simple texts of moderate difficulty. Prerequisites: 1A or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Textbooks

Conversational Vietnamese, 7th edition; Bac Hoai Tran; Tan Van 2010; ISBN: Conv Viet

Vietnamese Dictionary & Phrasebook, 7th printing; Bac Hoai Tran and Courtney Norris; Hippocrene Books 2010; ISBN: 0781809916

INTRO VIETNAMESE

VIETNMS 1B
103 WHEELER
MTuWThF 1:00-2:00P
5
86006
TRAN, B H

An introduction to modern spoken and written Vietnamese, including intensive drill on basic phonology and grammar. By the end of the second semester the student should be able to function successfully in ordinary Vietnamese conversation and read simple texts of moderate difficulty. Prerequisites: 1A or equivalent or consent of instructor.

Textbooks

Conversational Vietnamese, 7th edition; Bac Hoai Tran; Tan Van 2010; ISBN: Conv Viet

Vietnamese Dictionary & Phrasebook, 7th printing; Bac Hoai Tran and Courtney Norris; Hippocrene Books 2010; ISBN: 0781809916

INTERMED VIET

VIETNMS 100B
80 BARROWS
MTuWThF 2:00-3:00P
5
86009
TRAN, B H

A second-year course in Vietnamese vocabulary and syntax with intensive drills on short colloquial expressions and auditory recognition of speech patterns. First semester course stresses phraseology, sentence building, rules of composition and development of students' communicative skills. By the end of the second semester students will learn to speak and write simple compositions and will have a cursory introduction to Vietnamese literature and sample readings from contemporary Vietnamese writers. Prerequisites: 100A or consent of instructor is a prerequisite for 100B.

Textbooks

Vietnamese Practical Dictionary, 1st edition; Bac Hoai Tran and Courtney Norris; Hippocrene Books 2010; ISBN: 0781812445

ADVANCED VIETNAMESE

VIETNMS 101B
104 GPB
MWF 12:00-1:00P
3
86015
TRAN, H

This course is designed for students who have already achieved an intermediate degree of proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing modern Vietnamese. Objective: to move students toward a greater level of fluency in each of these key areas and provide an introduction to the literature and culture of Vietnam by reading Vietnamese language texts. Readings will vary from semester to semester and will include novels, short stories, poetry, and essays from the classical, colonial, post-colonial, and contemporary periods. Topics to be addressed in class are the nature of the Sino-Vietnamese classical tradition; cultural legacies of French colonialism; the regional character of literary and cultural production; the emergence of a distinctive Vietnamese modernity, and the history of Vietnamese gender norms and relations. Regular attendance and participation in classroom activities is mandatory and no English will be spoken in class.

SEMINAR IN S,SEASN

S,SEASN 250
104 DWINELLE
F 2:00-5:00P
4
83404
EDWARDS, P S

Buddhist Movements in Modern Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka

Buddhism has inspired and informed a surprisingly diverse range of religious, textual, and political movements in modern Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka, including millenarian movements, scriptural reform movements, anti-colonial activism, and monastic boycotts of state actors. This interdisciplinary course explores the individuals, beliefs, influences, practices, and institutional developments that shaped, led and framed such movements in 19th and 20th century Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka. Key themes include sacred space and the rearticulation of Buddhist monuments and texts as sites and vehicles of markers of nation; the interplay between Buddhism and animism and the effect of purification movements on definitions of superstition; Buddhism and the environment; Buddhism and colonialism, Buddhism and nationalism, and the impact of Gandhi on specific Buddhist movements in Burma and beyond. Our key countries of study are Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Sri Lanka and Thailand, and our main temporal frame is 1850-1950.

Textbooks

Locations of Buddhism: Colonialism and Modernity in Sri Lanka; Ann Blackburn; University of Chicago Press 2010; ISBN: 0226055078

Powerful Learning: Buddhist Literati and the Throne in Burma's Last Dynasty; Michael Charney; University of Michigan Press 2006; ISBN: 0891480935

How to Behave: Buddhism and Modernity in Cambodia; Anne Hansen; University of Hawai'i Press 2011; ISBN: 0824836006

Spirits of the Place: Buddhism and Lao Religious Culture; John Holt; University of Hawai'i Press 2009; ISBN: 0824833279

Curators of the Buddha: The Study of Buddhism under Colonialism; Donald Lopez; University of Chicago Press 1996; ISBN: 0226493091

Harp of Burma; Michio Takeyama; Tuttle Books 1964; ISBN: 0804802327

Gathering Leaves and Lifting Words; Justin McDaniel; University of Washington Press 2008; ISBN: 0295988495

Buddha in the Jungle; Kamala Tivanavich; University of Washington Press 2004; ISBN: 0295983728

 

 

ELEM SANSKRIT

SANSKR 100B
80 BARROWS
MWF 8:00-10:00A
5
85303
GOLDMAN, S J

Elements of Sanskrit grammar and practice in reading Sanskrit texts.

Textbooks

The Roots, Verb-Forms, and Primary Derivatives of the Sanskrit Language; W. D. Whitney; American Oriental 1945; ISBN: 8120804856

A Sanskrit Reader; C. R. Lanman; Harvard University Press 1967; ISBN: 0674789008

INTERMED SANSKRIT

SANSKR 101B
129 BARROWS
MF 12:00-2:00P
5
85306
GOLDMAN, S J

Selected readings readings vary each semester. In addition, students are required to memorize verses, read selected secondary scholarship, and lead an in-class discussion. Grammatical review will be provided as necessary. Grading is based on class performance, mid-term, final, and translation project. Kavya and Sastra: Course readings focus on Kavya and/or Sastra.

SANSKRIT LITERATURE

SANSKR 200B
346B DWINELLE
MF 2:00-3:30P
4
85309
GOLDMAN, R P

Selected readings readings vary each semester. In addition, students are required to memorize verses, read selected secondary scholarship, and lead an in-class discussion. Grammatical review will be provided as necessary. Grading is based on class performance, mid-term, final, and translation project. Kavya and Sastra: Course readings focus on Kavya and/or Sastra.

SANSKRIT PHIL TEXTS

SANSKR 207
125 DWINELLE
Th 2:00-5:00P
4
85312
KNUTSON, J R

Medieval Court Poetry

Comparative reading of courtly literature and inscriptions from the 12th/13th century and beyond. Continuing with the themes of last year's seminar, we seek to understand how idioms of literary political expression evolved in a later period of Sanskrit poetry and epigraphy.

INTRD CIV SE ASIA

SEASIAN 10B
219 DWINELLE
TuTh 11:00-12:30P
4
84103
HADLER, J A

Peoples and Cultures of Island Southeast Asia

This course is an introduction to the cultures, histories, and literatures of Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and East Timor, nations that comprise an area known traditionally as the Malay World. Grounding ourselves in the classical kingdoms of Southeast Asia through the coming of Islam and the early modern era, we will pay particular attention to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: the entrenchment of European and American imperialism, the rise of Southeast Asian nationalism, and developments in modern Southeast Asia up through the aftermath of the fall of Marcos, Soeharto, and Mahathir. We will analyze the role that history, and especially “classical” history, plays in modern Southeast Asia. We will discuss the role of religion, of Islam and Roman Catholicism, in private and political life, situating insular Southeast Asia both within a global and a regional Southeast Asian context. These themes will be introduced, as much as possible, through works of fiction and primary source materials in translation. The course has a research component—methods for conducting original research and use of library collections will lead to a focused research paper. Readings will include fiction by Jose Rizal, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Muhammad Radjab, Maria Dermoût, and Carlos Bulosan, and scholarly writings by Clifford Geertz, James Scott, and Benedict Anderson.

Textbooks

The Living House; Roxana Waterson; Tuttle Publishing 2010; ISBN: 0804841209

Noli Me Tangere (Shaps Library of Translations); Jose P. Rizal and Soledad Lacson-Locsin; University of Hawai'i Press 1997; ISBN: 0824819179

This Earth of Manking; Pramoedya Ananta Toer; Penguin 1996; ISBN: 0140256350

Imagined Communities; Benedict Anderson; New Left Books 1991; ISBN: 0860915468

Telling Lives, Telling History; Susan Rodgers; University of California Press 1995; ISBN: 0520085477

Ten Thousand Things; Maria Dermout; NYRB Classics 2002; ISBN: 159017013X

Kampung Boy; Lat; First Second 2006; ISBN: 1596431210

 

INTRD CIV SE ASIA

SEASIAN 10B
228 DWINELLE
Th 3:00-4:00P
-
84106
DJALIUS, Y

Peoples and Cultures of Island Southeast Asia

This course is an introduction to the cultures, histories, and literatures of Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and East Timor, nations that comprise an area known traditionally as the Malay World. Grounding ourselves in the classical kingdoms of Southeast Asia through the coming of Islam and the early modern era, we will pay particular attention to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: the entrenchment of European and American imperialism, the rise of Southeast Asian nationalism, and developments in modern Southeast Asia up through the aftermath of the Marcos, Soeharto, and Mahathir regimes. We will analyze the role that history, and especially "classical" history, plays in modern Southeast Asia. We will discuss the role of religion, of Islam and Roman Catholicism, in private and political life, situating insular Southeast Asia both within a global and a regional Southeast Asian context. These themes will be introduced, as much as possible, through works of fiction and primary source materials in translation. The course has a research component-methods for conducting original research and use of library collections will lead to a focused research paper. Readings will include fiction by Jose Rizal, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Ibrahim Jubaira, Shirley Lim, Maria Dermout, Lat, Muhammad Radjab, and Carlos Bulosan, and scholarly writings by Benedict Anderson, Harry Benda, Clifford Geertz, James Scott, Roxana Waterson and others.

INTRD CIV SE ASIA

SEASIAN 10B
187 DWINELLE
F 1:00-2:00P
-
84109
DJALIUS, Y

Peoples and Cultures of Island Southeast Asia

This course is an introduction to the cultures, histories, and literatures of Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei and East Timor, nations that comprise an area known traditionally as the Malay World. Grounding ourselves in the classical kingdoms of Southeast Asia through the coming of Islam and the early modern era, we will pay particular attention to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: the entrenchment of European and American imperialism, the rise of Southeast Asian nationalism, and developments in modern Southeast Asia up through the aftermath of the Marcos, Soeharto, and Mahathir regimes. We will analyze the role that history, and especially "classical" history, plays in modern Southeast Asia. We will discuss the role of religion, of Islam and Roman Catholicism, in private and political life, situating insular Southeast Asia both within a global and a regional Southeast Asian context. These themes will be introduced, as much as possible, through works of fiction and primary source materials in translation. The course has a research component-methods for conducting original research and use of library collections will lead to a focused research paper. Readings will include fiction by Jose Rizal, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Ibrahim Jubaira, Shirley Lim, Maria Dermout, Lat, Muhammad Radjab, and Carlos Bulosan, and scholarly writings by Benedict Anderson, Harry Benda, Clifford Geertz, James Scott, Roxana Waterson and others.

INTRO TO FILIPINO

FILIPN 1B
50 BARROWS
MTuWThF 1:00-2:00P
5
84506
ABAN, C

FRESHMAN SEMINAR

S,SEASN 24
332 GIANNINI
M 2:00-3:00P
1
83211
EDWARDS, P S

Elephant, Monkey, Rabbit: Animal Magic in South and Southeast Asia

From trickster monkeys and rabbit judges to the elephantine and divine, this seminar will examine animal motifs and meanings in the cultures of South and Southeast Asia. Our sources will be legends, folk tales, Buddhist stories, oral histories and the theatrical, visual and plastic arts. We will also examine how such figures as Hanuman from the Ramayana and the Hindu deity Ganesh have traveled–and continue to travel—in translation from South to Southeast Asia. We will examine the magic, majesty and myth of elephants as well as the mischief of monkeys and a range of other animals, including judgmental rabbits and pious crocodiles. We will situate our readings against Lewis Hyde's seminal book, Trickster Makes This World: Mischief, Myth and Art. This seminar will also include several specialist presentations on the animal lore of specific cultures and countries in South and Southeast Asia, by faculty of the Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies.  Assessment is through active participation (40%) and written exercises (60%). Course materials will include a reader designed exclusively for this course, and Lewis Hyde's book, Trickster Makes this World: Mischief, Myth and Art. This course is designed for students with a love of folklore and myth, and an interest in the diversity of cultural idiom. No background in South or Southeast Asia is required.   This seminar is part of the Connections@Cal initiative.

Penny Edwards is Associate Professor of South and Southeast Asian Studies at UC Berkeley.

Faculty web site: http://sseas.berkeley.edu/people/faculty/penny-edwards

 

Textbooks

Trickster makes this world; Lewis Hyde; Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux 1998; ISBN: 0374958033

STD IN S,SEASN LAN

S,SEASN 149
20 STEPHENS
MF 2:00-3:30P
3
83256
JAIN, U R

Learn to Speak Hindi

This course will introduce students to the basics of Hindi language as it is spoken in India today. The emphasis will be on speaking and oral comprehension. The class will provide students with a brief introduction to the grammar, sentence patterns and essential vocabulary of standard Hindi. Examples and classroom discussions will largely be based on "real life" scenarios that students may encounter when visiting India for research or employment.

Dept/Crssort icon Sec Title Instructor Days/Times Location CCN
BANGLA 1B 1 INTRO BENGALI BASU, A MW 12:00-2:00P, F 12:00-1:00P 205 WHEELER 84403
FILIPN 1B 1 INTRO TO FILIPINO ABAN, C MTuWThF 11:00-12:00P 54 BARROWS 84503
FILIPN 100B 1 INTERMED FILIPINO BARRIOS-LEBLANC, M MTuWThF 2:00-3:00P 50 BARROWS 84509
FILIPN 101B 1 ADVANCED FILIPINO BARRIOS-LEBLANC, M MWF 3:00-4:00P 80 BARROWS 84512
FILIPN 1B 2 INTRO TO FILIPINO ABAN, C MTuWThF 1:00-2:00P 50 BARROWS 84506
HIN-URD 1B 1 INTRD HINDI HUETTEMANN, A MTuWThF 8:00-9:00A 31 EVANS 84603
HIN-URD 1B 2 INTRD HINDI HUETTEMANN, A MTuWThF 10:00-11:00A 31 EVANS 84606
HIN-URD 2B 1 INTRD URDU JALIL, Q MTuWThF 11:00-12:00P 210 DWINELLE 84611
HIN-URD 100B 1 INTERMEDIATE HINDI HUETTEMANN, A MW 12:00-1:00P 204 WHEELER 84612
HIN-URD 100B 101 INTERMEDIATE HINDI HUETTEMANN, A F 12:00-2:00P 204 WHEELER 84615
HIN-URD 101B 1 READINGS MODERN HIN JAIN, U R MWF 12:00-1:00P 80 BARROWS 84618
HIN-URD 103B 1 INTERMEDIATE URDU JALIL, Q MWF 2:00-3:00P 129 BARROWS 84621
HIN-URD 104B 1 ADVANCED URDU JALIL, Q MWF 3:00-4:00P 103 WHEELER 84624
HIN-URD 221 1 HINDI LITERATURE DALMIA, V W 3:00-6:00P 358B DWINELLE 84627
KHMER 1B 1 INTRO KHMER SMITH, F J MTuWThF 2:00-3:00P 106 DWINELLE 84803
KHMER 100B 1 INTERMED KHMER SMITH, F J MW 4:00-5:30P, TuTh 4:00-5:00P 33 DWINELLE 84806
KHMER 101B 1 ADVANCED KHMER SMITH, F J TuTh 11:00-12:30P 2125 DWINELLE 84809
MALAY/I 1B 1 INTROD INDONESIAN LUNDE, N K MW 10:00-12:00P, F 10:00-11:00A 103 WHEELER 85003
MALAY/I 100B 1 INTERMED INDONESIAN LUNDE, N K 104 DWINELLE, F 12:00-1:00P 102 BARROWS, MW 12:00-2:00P 85006
MALAY/I 210B 1 SEM MAL LET ORL TRD TIWON, S C W 3:00-6:00P 104 DWINELLE 85009
PUNJABI 1B 1 INTROD PUNJABI UBHI, U K B4 DWINELLE F 10:00-12:00P 78 BARROWS TuTh 2:00-3:30P, 85203
PUNJABI 100B 1 INTERMED PUNJABI UBHI, U K B4 DWINELLE F 10:00-12:00P 123 DWINELLE TuTh 12:30-2:00P, 85206
S ASIAN 1B 1 CIV MED & MOD INDIA FARUQUI, M D TuTh 12:30-2:00P 88 DWINELLE 84003
S ASIAN R5B 1 INDIA WRITERS EYE MURCHIE, I MWF 8:00-9:00A 123 DWINELLE 84006
S ASIAN R5B 2 INDIA WRITERS EYE ARCHAMBAULT, H MWF 9:00-10:00A 123 DWINELLE 84009
S ASIAN R5B 3 INDIA WRITERS EYE ACHARYA, S MWF 1:00-2:00P 123 DWINELLE 84012
S ASIAN R5B 4 INDIA WRITERS EYE UM, J TuTh 8:00-9:30A 104 DWINELLE 84015
S ASIAN R5B 5 INDIA WRITERS EYE PAUL, A MWF 9:00-10:00A 263 DWINELLE 84018
S ASIAN R5B 6 INDIA WRITERS EYE LITTLE, L TuTh 3:30-5:00P 175 DWINELLE 84021
S ASIAN 121 1 CLASSIC IND LIT TRS KNUTSON, J R TuTh 11:00-12:30P 203 WHEELER 84027
S ASIAN 121 101 CLASSIC IND LIT TRS KNUTSON, J R Tu 4:00-5:00P 2070 VALLEY LS 84030
S ASIAN C114 1 TIBETAN BUDDHISM TBD TuTh 11:00-12:30P 156 DWINELLE 84024
S ASIAN C142 1 INDIA'S GREAT EPICS GOLDMAN, R P MWF 11:00-12:00P 2060 VLSB 84039
S ASIAN C215B 1 INDIAN BUDDHST TEXT BAUMS, S W 3:00-6:00P 288 DWINELLE 84042
S ASIAN C127 1 RELIGN ERLY INDIA BAUMS, S TuTh 3:30-5:00P 242 DWINELLE 84033
S,SEASN 190 1 SEMINAR S,SEASN BARRIOS-LEBLANC, M TuTh 12:30-2:00P 122 BARROWS 83257
S,SEASN 39I 1 FRESH/SOPH SEMINAR
BARRIOS-LEBLANC, M
LUNDE, N K
TRAN, B H
ABAN, C C
Tu 9-11A B4 DWINELLE 83214
S,SEASN R5B 1 UNDER WESTERN EYES KEO, S MWF 3:00-4:00P 210 DWINELLE 83203
S,SEASN R5B 2 UNDER WESTERN EYES LOWMAN, I TuTh 8:00-9:30A 201 WHEELER 83206
S,SEASN R5B 3 UNDER WESTERN EYES LOWMAN, I TuTh 12:30-2:00P 204 WHEELER 83209
S,SEASN 39G 1 FRESH/SOPH SEMINAR HART, K F 8:00-10:00A L45 UNIT III DIN 83212
S,SEASN C51 104 INTRO TOPIC REL ST TBD Th 2-3P 39 EVANS 83226
S,SEASN C51 1 INTRO TOPIC REL ST LITTLE, L TuTh 11:00-12:30P 9 LEWIS 83215
S,SEASN C51 101 INTRO TOPIC REL ST TBD W 3:00-4:00P 179 DWINELLE 83218
S,SEASN C51 102 INTRO TOPIC REL ST TBD W 4:00-5:00P 80 BARROWS 83221
S,SEASN C51 103 INTRO TOPIC REL ST TBD Th 1:00-2:00P 41 EVANS 83224
S,SEASN 120 1 TOPICS S,SEASN LEWIS, S L TuTh 2:00-3:30P 175 DWINELLE 83248
S,SEASN 120 2 TOPICS S,SEASN TIWON, S C TuTh 3:30-5:00P 109 WHEELER 83251
S,SEASN 250 2 SEMINAR IN S,SEASN FARUQUI, M D W 3:00-6:00P 102 LATIMER 83401
S,SEASN 250 1 SEMINAR IN S,SEASN HADLER, J A M 3:00-6:00P 1229 DWINELLE 83398
S,SEASN 250 3 SEMINAR IN S,SEASN EDWARDS, P S F 2:00-5:00P 104 DWINELLE 83404
S,SEASN 24 1 FRESHMAN SEMINAR EDWARDS, P S M 2:00-3:00P 332 GIANNINI 83211
S,SEASN 149 1 STD IN S,SEASN LAN JAIN, U R MF 2:00-3:30P 20 STEPHENS 83256
SANSKR 100B 1 ELEM SANSKRIT GOLDMAN, S J MWF 8:00-10:00A 80 BARROWS 85303
SANSKR 101B 1 INTERMED SANSKRIT GOLDMAN, S J MF 12:00-2:00P 129 BARROWS 85306
SANSKR 200B 1 SANSKRIT LITERATURE GOLDMAN, R P MF 2:00-3:30P 346B DWINELLE 85309
SANSKR 207 1 SANSKRIT PHIL TEXTS KNUTSON, J R Th 2:00-5:00P 125 DWINELLE 85312
SEASIAN 10B 1 INTRD CIV SE ASIA HADLER, J A TuTh 11:00-12:30P 219 DWINELLE 84103
SEASIAN 10B 101 INTRD CIV SE ASIA DJALIUS, Y Th 3:00-4:00P 228 DWINELLE 84106
SEASIAN 10B 102 INTRD CIV SE ASIA DJALIUS, Y F 1:00-2:00P 187 DWINELLE 84109
TAMIL 1B 1 INTROD TAMIL HART, K TuTh 9:30-11:00A 3401 DWINELLE 85603
TAMIL 1B 101 INTROD TAMIL HART, K UNSCHEDULED NO FACILITY 85606
TAMIL 101B 1 READINGS IN TAMIL HART, K TuTh 11:00-12:30P 89 DWINELLE 85609
TAMIL 210B 1 SMR TAMIL LIT HART, G L UNSCHEDULED 350B DWINELLE -
TELUGU 1B 1 ELEM TELUGU SUNKARI, H WF 12:00-2:00P 185 BARROWS 85803
THAI 100B 1 INTERMEDIATE THAI CHOWCHUVECH, S TuTh 5:30-7:30P, W 6:00-7:00P 187 DWINELLE 85903
VIETNMS 100B 2 INTERMED VIET TRAN, H MTuWThF 2:00-3:00P 289 CORY 86012
VIETNMS 1B 1 INTRO VIETNAMESE TRAN, B H MTuWThF 12:00-1:00P 31 EVANS 86003
VIETNMS 1B 2 INTRO VIETNAMESE TRAN, B H MTuWThF 1:00-2:00P 103 WHEELER 86006
VIETNMS 100B 1 INTERMED VIET TRAN, B H MTuWThF 2:00-3:00P 80 BARROWS 86009
VIETNMS 101B 1 ADVANCED VIETNAMESE TRAN, H MWF 12:00-1:00P 104 GPB 86015